7.62x39 "05 87" with damaged bullet

What was being done by the previous owner? He could crush the mantle easily, and he did not, he went in a circular way, but never pulled the bullet.




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DDR ( East Germany) 7,62x39 cartridge that has been in a post- Re-unification Demilitarization process ( un-successful).
In the early 90s large quantities of Warsaw pact Ammo. was dismantled by machine to scrap it
And recover the powder to make Fertilizer. The process used
Slit the case longitudinally ( see groove in case) any grabbed the projectile with pliers type jaws.

The whole process was Un-economical…the resultant scrap metal was to costly to segregate…
Steel cored bullets into copper, lead and steel, steel cases and brass primers ( still live) and the Nitro cellulose Powder, convert into Fertiliser cost more in processing than what it was worth on the Market. It was a UN Money
Wasting exercise.
Some ammo did get onto the surplus market ( Platzpatrone, and short range cartridges). The whole program was a fiasco.

Whilst such a program worked in the 1920s with Bulk Artillery Powder into Fertilizer, ( after WWI)
No way it could be economically done with small arms cartridge powder recovered from small arms ammo ( then or now ).

Doc AV

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Hm, I have my doubts the cartridge was tortured by the demil program.

Firstly, it is or was a short range cartridge, those were selling in the US in large quantities.
Secondly, if it was in the demil mill, the bullet would INDEED have been pulled and the primer would be drilled out.

To me it looks someone engaged nipper pliers and gave up if the bullet remained in place.

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It looks to me like they tried (and failed) to snip the tip off with wire cutters.

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Jon, yes, exactly, but why not to succeed? It is rather simple to do.

The tool marks are looking very uniform. I would exclude pliers.

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Trials for short range hunting/plinking with a pre-crashed point to avoid rebounds?

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These have a solid plastic core, I think a weakened jacket will not change anything as the core will stay in one piece + the indentations are no sufficient weakening even for a lead cored FMJ it seems.

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Not necessary that the core broke itself after impact (even if it would be better for the best final result anti-rebound). Imagine a mint empty cola can: you can jump on it without smashing it; but if you create a little damage on its perimeter, you can crush it quite easily.
anyway, in this case, I think simply that someone tried to pull out the bullet with some tool and then abandoned.

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Those solid plastic cores with the steel jacket are surprisingly strong. I’ve fired them through 6"-8" diameter trees… the recovered projectiles I’ve examined and the few I’ve sectioned, the plastic felt almost like Nylon. Any idea what the actual polymer used was?

I think DocAV’s theory is plausible, but the “groove” in the case looks more like a line or shadow from the photography since it appears to be in nearly the same place in each presumably rotated image.

The provenance of the cartridge in question might help out here… Was it in a packet of normal appearing rounds? A single specimen from another collector?

None of the reloading/bullet pulling tools I’m familiar with would leave a mark like that, so I doubt it it was someone tinkering with it at home.

A single specimen from a gun show.

Is there a rattle from propellant? Just wondering if it was somebody using a standard collet bullet puller extractor to deactivate the cartridge and then put the bullet back in position. Bearing in mind the light plastic cored bullet, this would be an easier option than a kinetic bullet puller. I have a charger of 20x 7.35mm Carcano rounds that I bought from a UK dealer, Henry Krank’s, as a teenager nearly forty years ago, and every bullet had been removed with a collet bullet extractor and replaced back in the case (pictures below of one of the cartridges and a close up of the collet marks on the bullet ogive.)


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As you say, this happens when a collet with a too small caliber is being used. Very typical marks.
While no problem to the shooter this of course is ruining the historical value of an item.

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Like I said, if demil the projectile would have been pulled and the primer would have been drilled out

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Very true Alex. In my experience non-collecting shooters tend not to get as upset as us cartridge researcher / collectors about such things!

As I sold a lot of AK47 bullets to Lübben…the demillingplace for the AK47 ammo, I knew that they partly replaced the ironcore bullets with my leadcore bullets…That was about 750000 to 1.000000 with bullets replaced, and an other big part destroyed in the way Hans has described above…
The Training bullets where not at all destroyed or bullets replaced. They got CIP approvement and than sold trough Frankonia to the public in huge quantithies…They where also exported to many other countries for funshooting purposes
So, its very unlikely that this marks coming from the german demill-place
Pp

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Yes, there is powder movement. It is muffled so I think there is not much empty room inside. I weighed it at home, it is 12 grammes.

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