7,62x39 Bulgarian and Hungarian Dummy


#1

May be these pictures could be interesting for 7,62x39 collectors

Bulgarian Dummies where made of standard case without primer, FMJ steel core bullets and spring inside the case. Overal surface of the cartridge was tinned. Early models has two holes in the case and 3 dot crimps on the case neck. About 1970-th holes and crimps was abandoned.

Hungarian Dummies has a similar design, but bullet in the case neck was fixed with hard cannelure and primer pocket was loaded with empty primer cup

Interesting, that in 1961 Hungarian Dummies was packed in long cardboard boxes, the same dimentiones as early Soviet boxes of 1950th. At least in 1960, USSR start to use “economic” small size boxes. Bulgarian box with Dummies (headstamp 10 77) also has small size.
Picture with boxes:
Small size Bulgarian box with Dummies 1977 dated
Big Hungarian box with Dummies 1961 dated
Big USSR box with BZ (API) rounds 1951 dated
Small USSR box with Ball rounds 1960 dated


#2

That’s a nice Hungarian box! Great to see.


#3

Thank you!


#4

treshkin–Great set of pictures, especially the boxes and the sectioned cartridges.

I am in the process of doing the revised edition of my DVD “A Master List of 7.62 x 39’s” which will be illustrated with pictures of the cartridges, with sectioned views where available. Would you mind if I used some of these images on my DVD. Of course,full credit would be given.


#5

No, problem. I only need that all my pictures will be signed with my Nick-name.

I also have another specimens of 7,62x39 form USSR, Bulgary, Czeh, Ukraine. And some commercial rounds from Russia and Ukraine.
I need to check my collection and then I will send you list of specimens by PM, you will let me know what you need, and I send you a pictures.

It will be a good cooperation, I think.




#6

Very nice displays & work. Thanks for posting.


#7

Hi,

now I bought 2 of them, but whats the function of the spring?
Its not for the primer.


#8

From the large diameter of the wire the spring is made from, which would make compression more difficult, I imagine it was an easy way to make a spacer that, along with the heavy crimp, makes it harder for the bullet to get pushed back into the case in use. It is common to find spacers in dummies, as we all know, and they take many forms depending on factory, country, caliber, etc.

Just a guess on my part. Our friend Treshkin will probably know all the technical “what and why” of it.


#9

Thank you.