7.62x39 headstamp, Korean?


#1

I found this with some old mixed Russian ammo. I don’t recognize the head stamp, and can’t seem to find much this morning with Google. Something sticks in my mind that this could be Korean or some such as I remember discussion about a triangle and an odd character.

Anyone know what this is? Is it a less-than-common cartridge?


#2

fatelk–This is a North Korea 7.62x39. It is pictured upside down. The character at 12 o’clock in your photo (should be at 6 o’clock) is one of 11 Koreann letters used as a date code for the years 1959-1969. This one is for the year 1969.


#3

Good one. That symbol is not one of the more common ones.


#4

Once we are on the subject. Does anyone know if North Korea did ever export ammunition? And if so who received it?


#5

It has been found in Southern Africa and South America. I believe Nicaragua and Zimbabwe were big users of DRPK smallarms ammo.


#6

Thanks a lot Jon!


#7

Perú also received ammunition and other armaments from North Korea during their problems with the Sendero Luminoso (shining Path) Communist insurgents. I had a few rounds brought back for me by a friend years ago. The had enough AKs and the like that they also made the cartridge themselves. Interesting situation with an anti-communist Army serving a Communist President, using huge quantities of Combloc weapons and ammunition, and Russian advisors, to hunt down and kill communist (Maoist) guerrillas. Probably no similar political situation ever, at least in South America.

John Moss


#8

You all are great! Thanks for the info. This is a good one for my small collection.


#9

John, thank you too.


#10

… edit


#11

After the first “free of charge” deliveries made by the Soviet Union in 1980-1981, Grenada also had an agreement with North Korea for the delivery of the followings items in 1983-84:

  • Hand flares: 200 pcs
  • Ammunition for hand flares: 4,000 rds
  • 7.62mm automatic rifle: 1,000 pcs
  • 7.62mm light machine gun: 50 pcs
  • Ammunition for 7.62mm auto. rifle: 360,000 rds
  • 7.62mm blanks: 300,000 rds
  • 7.62mm heavy machine gun: 30 pcs
  • Ammunition for heavy machine gun: 60,000 rds
  • RPG-7 launcher: 50 pcs
  • RPG-7: 500 rds
  • Hand grenade: 200 rds
  • Instruction hand grenade: 20 rds
  • Binoculars (8x): 30 pcs
  • Anti-gas masks: 1,000 pcs

It is not known how much of this was actually received before the US invasion on October 25th, 1983.


#12

Fede, interesting to see. Did ever any images surface?


#13

[quote=“EOD”]Once we are on the subject. Does anyone know if North Korea did ever export ammunition? And if so who received it?[/quote][color=#0040FF]A[/color]bout my first N. Korean 7,62x39 [color=#0040FF]I[/color] was told it was found in Cyprus (together with my first 04 and bxn), remnant of the North-South conflict there in the mid 70s.

Hans
[color=#0040FF]Edited 1 time[/color]


#14

[quote=“Hans”][quote=“EOD”]Once we are on the subject. Does anyone know if North Korea did ever export ammunition? And if so who received it?[/quote]about my first N. Korean 7,62x39 was told it was found in Cyprus (together with my first 04 and bxn), remnant of the North-South conflict there in the mid 70s.

Hans[/quote]

Who would have used them at that time? Since Turkey and Greece were both NATO countries (back then already?) I wonder who was doing arms trade with communist states. Or did I get off the track now?


#15

Remember: I wrote “I was told” about where they were found (by a usually credible colleague of ours). It would not have been the first time that aid was not sent from own stocks to keep support under blanket.

Hans


#16

As it still is right now with Syria for example and Libya shortly before.

I wonder if they have been using AKs at that time. Somewhat unusual in my eyes. Can anybody elaborate on the presence of Aks in that conflict?


#17

EOKA-B might have sneaked some into Cyprus in the late '60s-early '70s, or some resistance group after the 1974 Turkish invasion, but I would call either a long-shot.