7.62x39 Russian packaging question


#1

Is not this packaging rather expensive and extensive (thick padded paper covered with a transparent layer of plastic)? It has a look of a small water-proof battle pack. Is it made to be taken deep in the woods for a long moose/elk hunt in the marshes or something?


#2

Vlad

I’m guessing cheaper than putting it in a can. And probably to pass some packaging criteria established for importing to the US. And the fact that it is ball ammo is at best mislabeling, re the “Hunting Specifications”. But then, depends on what one is hunting.


#3

This is in effect a Soviet version of the “battle pack”. I asked this question here a few years ago or so and was told the following: During the Soviet involvement in Afghanistan it was recognized that getting into the standard “ham can” that small arms ammo was packed in was not quick or easy to get into under battlefield conditions. As a result, some amunition was packed in these 120 round (7.62x39mm) milk-carton like battle packs. It also provided better protection for the ammunition while being carried by a soldier in his rucksack, etc… Both 7.62x39mm and 5.45x39mm were packed this way. Also, the ammunition within had blackened primers as opposed to the standard brass. This was an extra element of protection for the cartridges since they were not packed in the sealed metal can. Why the commercial ammunition was packed this way is anyone’s guess, but I suspect that it was cheaper, lighter and easier than packing it in the metal cans, and they were probably already set up for it from the military production runs. I think it only came in like this for a few years at most, mostly from the “Klimovsk” plant, but also reportedly “Ulanyovsk”. After the era of these battle packs, 1995-1997 or so, the Russian ammo manufacturers shifted towards more commercial headstamps and packaging.

AKMS


#4

Klimovsk 22 ammo was packed this way as well. Check out sportsmans guide for pics.


#5

The Russian Military is using this packing still today. These packs have then a “continous print” on them giving the caliber, projectile type, case type, qty and sometimes year + factory code.

Those 7.62x39 being marked with year and factory code were from 1983 and plant 711 (KSPZ Klimovsk).

The 5,45x39 with 7N24 AP (tungsten core) had no factory code on but should be made by Armursk only - if no other plants have started production recently.


#6

EOD,

What is the outer packing for these “battle packs” like? Is it still a wooden crate? What is the quantity? Any special markings to identify the new packing style?

AKMS


#7

I do not know how the outer packing looks like. I assume it to be the boxes we all know. Unfortunately I have never seen such a wooden box.