7.62x51 Dummies stenciled INERT


#1

Does anyone have an example of these 7.62x51 dummies stenciled INERT? Picture was taken at Springfield Armory on November 19, 1958.


#2

Fede

Not the exact same cartridges but close. These are Cal .30 Light Rifle, headstamped FA 51 with a T11 bullet, FA 54 with a T21 bullet. They are loaded with 49.5 grains of Sodium Carbonate.

I think I showed one or more of these on another thread but, as usual, I cannot find it.

Ray


#3

Ray, thank you very much for posting this picture and information. Do you know who made this type of dummies? I assume none of these have a “T” designation assigned. Regards, Fede.


#4

Fede

I do not know who made those particular dummy cartridges. I always assumed they were made by Frankford Arsenal. I’ve never seen a “T” number assigned to them.

Likewise the various dummies made after the adoption of the cartridge as the 7.62mm NATO. Many of them have no designation that I know of, especially those with colored tips.

Ray


#5

Fede
I have two examples from this time period. Top (+) LC 58 brass case, bottom (+) LC 56 steel case. The primers are pierced and look to be brass but as the case heads are heavily corroded, I can’t be 100% sure. Both cartridges have GM bullets with steel cores. The bullet in the '58 case is engraved with the number 37. This means of identification suggests to me that this round was more than just a dummy but part of some specific test. It’s been suggested that these cartridges were part of a corrosion test but for what purpose I can’t say. An alternative explanation (and probably more likely) is that the filler (sodium chloride or carbonate) has leached out via the pierced primer and over time has resulted in the observed corrosion.

NATO Dave


#6

Two more examples.
both are brass cased and stamped (+) LC 58 and have drilled / pierced primers. Can’t tell of what metal.

The dark base / head on the “36” stamped bullet one is from corrosion staining, not an intentional darkened base / head


#7

Dave & Pete, thank you very much for sharing pictures of your examples. The dummy cartridges with numbered bullets are very interesting and I wonder if these we part of the same set.

As a side note, years ago I found an Argentine 7.62x51 nickeled dummy having a case numbered 9, and in subsequent years found number 6 and 10 (all with cases made in 1959). I’m still hoping to find the rest…