7.62x54 Gallery? ID


#1

Hi,

I picked this round up at SLICS this year and can’t find out who made it or exactly what type of round it is. My guess is that it is either a gallery or practice round.

Any information you can provide about this cartridge would be most helpful.

Thank you.

Heavyiron


#2

Heavyiron–According to the IAA Headstamp Guide, “bxn” is Sellier & Bellot, Prague, Czechoslovakia, Factory in Zbrojovka Vl


#3

Ron,

I see that now. I was thinking it was OXN or DXN.

Do you know what type of cartridge it is?

Thanks.

Heavyiron


#4

I edited my original post for that information.


#5

Ron,

Excellent. Thanks for the info.

Heavyiron


#6

The Czech. nomenclature is “Redukovny” (or something similar) meaning “reduced-range”. The projectile is all steel. There is a steel “cup” covered with a steel jacket, leaving a hollow core. Weight is around 55 gr. The same projectile is also used in the 7.62x39mm reduced range load. A lot of this ammo was imported for the US shooter market a few years ago, making a once very scarce collector cartridge very common.

AKMS


#7

AKMS,

Thank you very much for the detailed information.

Heavyiron


#8

[quote=“AKMS”]The Czech. nomenclature is “Redukovny” (or something similar) meaning “reduced-range”. The projectile is all steel. There is a steel “cup” covered with a steel jacket, leaving a hollow core. Weight is around 55 gr. The same projectile is also used in the 7.62x39mm reduced range load. A lot of this ammo was imported for the US shooter market a few years ago, making a once very scarce collector cartridge very common.
AKMS[/quote]
AKMS,
just to make it more precise, it is “redukovany” meaning “reduced”. They also made it in their 7,62x45, possibly in the 7,5x45 and in the - we have no designation for it - 1946 headstamped experimentals of about that size. See iaaforum.org/forum2/viewtopic.ph … =post+wwii
it is the 3rd in the list.


#9

Thank you for the clarification. I was going from memory alone, so I thought I did pretty good! I also forgot about the 7.62x45mm, which I should not have, since I am looking at a secioned one above my desk right now!

AKMS


#10

Heavyiron,
The ammoman website currently has this stuff for sale for about $.30 per round. I have and have shot some of this ammunition. It is not particularly accurate, but it does seem to have a strange terminal(I am assuming) effect when fired into wet newsprint. The cup blows out of the bottom and the bullet becomes a hollow tube. I am not certain if this happens just after the round is fired or after the bullet strikes its target, but I would assume the latter.


-Allen


#11

It must be what you are shooting at. I’ve fired a lot of this type in 7.62x39mm and the recovered projectiles (fired into dirt berms) are either mostly intact or just dented. Never seen one lose the core/cup like that!

AKMS


#12

[quote=“AKMS”]It must be what you are shooting at. I’ve fired a lot of this type in 7.62x39mm and the recovered projectiles (fired into dirt berms) are either mostly intact or just dented. Never seen one lose the core/cup like that!

AKMS[/quote]

Hmmm…
Thanks AKMS. That is indeed curious. Do you think that perhaps there is more velocity out of the 7.62x54R? …Or maybe some sort of hydaulic effect caused this?

I shot another into the wet newspapers after recovering this one, just to make sure it wasn’t a fluke. The other one looked almost exactly the same, only it was flattened at the back. I will have to shoot more of them and see if they have the same result.


#13

I’d say a combination of higher velocity and the media the projectile was hitting. The very uniform turning-in of the nose says “hydraulic action” to me. I looked in my box of fired projectiles again and one of the short range projectiles fired from the x39 shows the nose slightly concave, but it is more ragged and torn on one side. This is probably from hitting a small rock or something. Looking at the sectioned examples in my collection, the nose of the jacket is not supported by the cup/core, so it seems logical that this area would be the first to deform upon impact. Since the cup is only held in by the base of the jacket, and being hollow, it also seems logical that it would squirt out the back when hitting water or wet paper. I’ll have to try some of my x39 loads against water and wet paper to see if I get the same results…

AKMS


#14

[quote=“AKMS”]I’d say a combination of higher velocity and the media the projectile was hitting. The very uniform turning-in of the nose says “hydraulic action” to me. I looked in my box of fired projectiles again and one of the short range projectiles fired from the x39 shows the nose slightly concave, but it is more ragged and torn on one side. This is probably from hitting a small rock or something. Looking at the sectioned examples in my collection, the nose of the jacket is not supported by the cup/core, so it seems logical that this area would be the first to deform upon impact. Since the cup is only held in by the base of the jacket, and being hollow, it also seems logical that it would squirt out the back when hitting water or wet paper. I’ll have to try some of my x39 loads against water and wet paper to see if I get the same results…

AKMS[/quote]

That has to be it then. I wonder if the velocity of the x39 bullets will be sufficient to cause the same kind of hyudraulic effect. You’ll have to keep me updated. I don’t have any of the 7.62x39 short-range rounds to test out, just the x54R. I wish I had bought some of the x39 ones a couple of years back when they were really cheap, but I missed out.