7.62x54R Russian 7N1 sniper loading


#1

aa


#2

What does the Russian headstamp say? What make a round to be called “sniper” (in general)?


#3

188 97. Special bullet and load.


#4

Can you expand on it (in general)? Is the load just hotter or it is a different propellant? Is a bullet a different shape or different material?


#5

The bullet above in cross section differs from the standard in construction. Open hollow base. Why ? How the load differs is not of interest to me. Maybe someone with interest in ballistics can help.


#6

The projectile weighs approx. 150 gr. and has a mild steel front core and a lead rear core, The jacket is that of the old “type D” heavy ball. The Sniper load is designated 7N1 and has no other special markings other than the word “Snaiperskye” in Cyrillic on the paper packets and spam can. Supposedly this ammunition is of a higher quality than regular ball ammo but those who have shot it are not reporting impressive results. It is certainly not “match” grade ammunition like what we think of that used by snipers. Apparently the Russian/Soviet philosophy on sniping and precision shooting are different than here in the US.

AKMS


#7

This ammo may be beyond acceptable shelf life for first class stores.


#8

Agreed, but 10 years seems like a short amount of time for this to happen. Don’t most countries surplus their ammunition stores after about 20 years?

From what I have gathered about this ammunition, it came out of a former Warsaw Pact country, not Russia, and the Russians were unhappy about it. I wonder if someone in that country smelled a profit… Or, as you suggsted, it is past it’s prime and was surplussed.

AKMS


#9

IT IS ALWAYS ABOUT PROFIT. SHELF LIFE VARIES FROM COUNTRY TO COUNTRY. WE FOUND WW 1 AMMO IN IRAQ MILITARY STORAGE AND IT STILL FIRES ! A couple of years back I took apart several of the .46 Remington RFs made by my family in 1864 and the powder still worked just fine. I used the headstamps to make a set of cuff links and vest buttons. I am not convinced that the shelf life of ammo is not a military-industrial complex boondogle. Given the casualty per shot fired ratio in even the best armies ( OURS - not to put too fine a point on it ) the reduction in accuracy in ammo over time is not really serious in terms of battlefield application. Lots of turkeyshoots were won with our surplused military ammo. It is always best to give our guys with guns the best but I am not convinced that this really matters.


#10

CSAEOD said [quote]A couple of years back I took apart several of the .46 Remington RFs made by my family in 1864 and the powder still worked just fine. I used the headstamps to make a set of cuff links and vest buttons. [/quote]

As if those CTM Co .46 rimfire weren’t already hard enough to find :_)


#11

Russian headstamp say:
188 - Novosibirsk plant (former #188)
97 - produced in 1997


#12

As if those CTM Co .46 rimfire weren’t already hard enough to find :_)[/quote] Before Buttweiler left the game he told me that he had SEEN a 55 gal drum 1/2 FULL of .46CTM rfs somewhere in TX. Would not tell where.