7.65 Argentine Mauser, Military or Commercial?


#1

I have a 7.65x53 with the FYA headstamp, made by Hirtenberger Patronen and the year 1928 but it is a pointed soft point bullet. The bullet is crimped and the primer is not, but has a purple sealer.

I was under the impression that exposed lead military rds were illegal by 1928 and this appears to be a military case. Any insight on why the soft point bullet?


#2

Shotmeister–I am sure it is a commercial loading using either pulled down cases or surplus cases. I remember buying these in Montgomery Wards in the early 1960’s. They were loose in a big bin of probably about 5000 rounds. If I recall correctly, they were 10 cents per round. Wards also had similar bins (different headtamps) of loose 8mm Mauser and .303 British.


#3

Thanks Ron. Its the only 7.65 Argt in this big pile of ammo and I actually had to look it up! I suspected something like your explanation.


#4

The HP 1928 FyA 7,65 could be possibly for Argentina (1st choice) or for Turkey, as Hirtenberger was supplying Turkey in 1928 with both 7,65mm as well as 7,9mm cartridges. (Packets of both seen on Web several years ago).

Turkey at the time was changing over to 7,9mm, and the Packets were already in Roman Script. (Late 1928 was the change over to Western style script and the new western alphabet, designed specifically for the Turkish language.
Sadly late last year I lost the Computer Wallpaper of a full sized HP packet and cartridges…they were a red printed label on a buff coloured cardboard.

1928 seems to be a Big production year for Hirtenberger for export Military ammo…maybe the Treaty restrictions of 1919-20 were more often being evaded??? Definitely by 1930 Steyr was exporting arms again under various guises (“Steyr Mannlicher” and “Steyr-Solothurn”).

More questions, less answers…

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics


#5

Can you post a picture? Thanks.


#6

For you Fede
Not the best quality but its the best I could get. The soft tipped bullet is not real clearand there is no visible cannelure on the bullet.

I’m pretty confident that Ron is correct in his assessment. It just smells right.


#7

Interarms did a lot of reloading of military-to-commercial ammo in the 1960s, I believe. Yours probably went that route.