7.65x53mm Argentine Observation Type R


#1

I was given this round at SLICS as a curiosity. If anyone ever needed a reason NOT to use an impact bullet puller on an 7.65x53mm Argentine Observation Type R round this should be it. Luckily the powder charge did not ignite and is still contained in the case.
The sharp, pointed firing pin protruding from the brass capsule apparently is what you hear rattling when you shake a live round. This one still rattles (It is loose in the capsule and can travel fore and aft) .


#2

I bet THAT was exciting…


#3

Was the donor missing digits??


#4

WOW! What is the color tip on that round, black?

Steve


#5

[quote=“pbutler”]I was given this round at SLICS as a curiosity. If anyone ever needed a reason NOT to use an impact bullet puller on an 7.65x53mm Argentine Observation Type R round this should be it. Luckily the powder charge did not ignite and is still contained in the case.
The sharp, pointed firing pin protruding from the brass capsule apparently is what you hear rattling when you shake a live round. This one still rattles (It is loose in the capsule and can travel fore and aft) .

[/quote]

In my case, the powder charge ingnite, the screw and the rim retainer simply dissapear, the body of the bullet puller remains intact but it acts as a “barrel”, the case was driven up and ends making a nice hole in the roof.
BTW, I have all my fingers !!!.


#6

Phil, bet your new puller cost more than the original one! That’s why you should always wear thick gloves and face protection when pulling any military bullet you don’t have a proven ID of. Even a collet type puller has been known to set a “popper” off. That’s why my powder and primers are stored way away from my bench tools. Best to pull outdoors.

Gourd


#7

Stevef
Yes, the bullet has a black tip

gamgjm
As I said in my 1st post, the exploded cartridge was given to me at the St. Louis Show. DGFM is the one who confessed to using a bullet puller on a simular round!!


#8

Here


#9

[quote=“DGFM”]In my case, the powder charge ingnite, the screw and the rim retainer simply dissapear, the body of the bullet puller remains intact but it acts as a “barrel”, the case was driven up and ends making a nice hole in the roof.
BTW, I have all my fingers !!!.[/quote]
Perhaps the bullet pullers are designed to fail at this point in case of accidental detonation?


#10

[quote=“Falcon”][quote=“DGFM”]In my case, the powder charge ingnite, the screw and the rim retainer simply dissapear, the body of the bullet puller remains intact but it acts as a “barrel”, the case was driven up and ends making a nice hole in the roof.
BTW, I have all my fingers !!!.[/quote]
Perhaps the bullet pullers are designed to fail at this point in case of accidental detonation?[/quote]

Maybe, in my case the bullet puller was RCBS brand, when I was pulling the bullet away, I was aware that it could be an spotter round so I took some security precautions.


#11

I have seen several of these observation rounds misidentified at SLICS.

Ditto as to being certain of the type ID before before disassembling a cartridge.

Heavyiron


#12

Is this also referred to as a ‘spotter’? Does it just have powder in the bullet, or is it something less stable than powder. Were these transported just like other ammunition, or did they require some type of special handling.


#13

The 7,65 x53 R in spanish “Reglaje” could be translated either as spotter or observation, because they were used by the machinegunners to direct the fire (seeing the point of impact)or to colimate -by the same way- the german (Carl Zeiss) optical sights of the Browning - Colt 1917/1928 machineguns.
I dont know exactly the composite of the detonating mixture of the bullet, I think it


#14

Thanks for the response.


#15

This round, a 7.9 Mauser B- Patrone was a longer time in the sun.



#16

ab


#17

The remaining internal parts of the 7.65x53mm Argentine Observation Type R and the 7.9x57mm German B-Patrone bullets appear to be rather similar. Does Josef Moetz have a drawing of the Type R in his books on Austrian ammo?

None of the books I have state exactly what the filler material is in the type R round. Small-Caliber Ammunition Identification Guide (U) Volume 1 comes the closest with:


#18

I just picked up 52 of these with the FyA 1929 H.A. headstamp with a group of other cartridges from the Rock Island Auction Company this past weekend, not identified in the description as such, so I am pretty certain they are unaware at this point what they have. I would like to find a collector in the Moline, Illinois area willing to pick them up and hold until some kind of arrangements can be made for me to get them. Anyone know someone in the area. I’d hate to tell the folks at RIA that they have to figure some way to dispose of these cartridges themselves.


#19

Excuse my ignorance but can’t they go by UPS like other cartridges


#20

Carolyn,
I would have to think they would be prohibited by DOT regs from shipment by UPS.