7.9 x 57 PmK v-Trop


#1

I’d appreciate some help identifying this cartridge. I can find nothing that refers to a bullet with a silver band in my limited references. The double struck headstamp is P S* 74 37.


#2

My guess would be that it’s a high velocity loading which would be marked with a green lacquer band in the same position as yours. If this has faded over the years I’d suggest the now clear lacquer combined with the colour of the jacket material underneath (which has kept it’s original colour due to it’s lacquer covering) could produce this silver effect.
Jim


#3

Thanks. I believe you are correct, as there does appear to be a greenish coloration on one section of the band. I had expected the green band would have been more obvious.


#4

Well, that


#5

Thanks Dutch. I didn’t even notice the 6 primer crimps.


#6

[quote=“Dutch”]Well, that


#7

Eagle eye CSAEOD, -:)

Well that


#8

Could it be a label identifier for the printers? It would seem, since all the information about the cartridge is inside the box, that anything printed outside the box is most likely not related to the identification of the contents.


#9

The bullet manufacturer’s code P174 seemed unfamiliar to me & a quick check showed it to be that of WKC Waffenfabrik of Solingen, ordinarily a cutlery specialist. It does make sense inasmuch as the hardened steel AP is, together with that incendiary element, the main component here. JG


#10

Ron, I don


#11

It means Polte, 174 Th lot of 1941

Dutch


#12

There are also Polte labels with both the “H” & “K” on them.


#13

Dutch: Glad I asked about the bullet code; otherwise I’d have convinced myself of a mistaken belief. If I may ask a question: I assume the letter B after Fuell indicates the supplier of the incendiary element–do you know what firm that indicates? Thanks, JG


#14

Well, so much for my idea of a label printing code.