7.92 magasine


#1

Found on a flea market, a magasine for a 7.92 Mauser.
The only marking is a J at the back.
Is it a genuine one ?
If yes value ?
Thanks
JP



#2

Germans experimented with extended Mauser magazines during WWI, I think. It has a cut-off latch, which would fit WWI mentality, like Lee-Enfield’s integral cut-off. I have no clue if it is original.


#3

Hi JP,
This magasine is made for the Mauser K98 its replace the standard magasine plate and put yours inplace. Than you have a 20 shots instead of 5. When its original it would be very rare.Most of these are copies.Price for a copy one is $58.
451kr


#4

Hi Leon !
How to see if it is a copy or not ??
JP


#5

JP,
Im sorry cant tell you. I know that the originals are very well made and not paint.Maby there is one that have an original one to compare.
451kr.


#6

I recently saw a similar discussion on a gun site. I will look for it and try to report back.

The following is from a respected member on the Gunboards website, whose name I will not post, as it is a bit inappropriate. I will gladly provide the name directly to anyone interested.

“The ( 25 round ) trench magazine is fairly scarce. As with the flash hider made for the kar98a that was also made in large quantities they both were unpopular with troops. As such the majority of these items issued simply were discarded by the troops and hence the rarity today.
A good condition trench magazine will easily start at $600 and can go up from there a couple more hundred. I passed on one over a decade ago at $725 , it took some years to find one and when I did I found another in short order and cheaper than I’d hoped for .
Originals are of course made sturdier and with a different finish. They were not blued like the repops are , none of their components will have a red tint to them either.The finish is a enamel black paint on the exterior with no paint on the interior. The spot welding will be very visible in the interior.
As well the followers on original trench mags are two varities which are unique to them only.One being a stamped sheet metal affairthat is “hollow” ( similar to a WW2 stamped follower but with a folded in place bottom) , and second is a stamped bottom with a steel ‘slat’ riveted to the top for the cartridge offset.
Also to note is the very early trench magaines did not come with the follower retainer clip and it’s little chain. Also early clips were a small solid peice of ‘flatstock’ while the majority of all produces were the stamped split type.”


#7

[quote=“Jon C.”]I recently saw a similar discussion on a gun site. I will look for it and try to report back.

The following is from a respected member on the Gunboards website, whose name I will not post, as it is a bit inappropriate. I will gladly provide the name directly to anyone interested.

“The ( 25 round ) trench magazine is fairly scarce. As with the flash hider made for the kar98a that was also made in large quantities they both were unpopular with troops. As such the majority of these items issued simply were discarded by the troops and hence the rarity today.
A good condition trench magazine will easily start at $600 and can go up from there a couple more hundred. I passed on one over a decade ago at $725 , it took some years to find one and when I did I found another in short order and cheaper than I’d hoped for .
Originals are of course made sturdier and with a different finish. They were not blued like the repops are , none of their components will have a red tint to them either.The finish is a enamel black paint on the exterior with no paint on the interior. The spot welding will be very visible in the interior.
As well the followers on original trench mags are two varities which are unique to them only.One being a stamped sheet metal affairthat is “hollow” ( similar to a WW2 stamped follower but with a folded in place bottom) , and second is a stamped bottom with a steel ‘slat’ riveted to the top for the cartridge offset.
Also to note is the very early trench magaines did not come with the follower retainer clip and it’s little chain. Also early clips were a small solid peice of ‘flatstock’ while the majority of all produces were the stamped split type.”[/quote]
thanks
Could you give me the mail of the guy ?
Thanks
JP