7.92mm Dummy Box


#1

Does anyone have any information on the country of origin of this box or what it


#2

pbutler,

I’m not the 7,9 expert but the box very much looks like Czechoslovak to me.

A German box would display 7,9 if at all, 7,92 is neighbours name. The decimal jacked up (good English?) I only saw on Czechoslovak labels of the pre WWII era. But this one smells like from after the war, PS odour.


#3

My reaction was also that the box looked Czech, post WWII.

PS did produce 9mmP for the Dutch just after WWII and the labels were in English. Perhaps this is something similar.

Cheers,

Lew


#4

I also think it might be Czech. The box was opened when I got it and I don


#5

Phil - those cartridges sure look like Platzpatrone 33s. I can’t believe they are dummies with those primers and primer seals. They may even be post-war Czech loads using the left over German wood bullets, although more likely they are WWII loadings, I would think. I doubt they are the original contents of the Dummy box. Just my opinion.


#6

Phil, try to look inside the box and check if there are impression marks from pointed projectiles left. If so they are certainly not from the wooden projectiles shown here and it will be an indication for a changed content of the box.
Just an idea.


#7

One thing is for certain. The rounds are definitely not dummies. They are a typical German Platzpatrone 33 loading. Here is one from the box.
The box, however, does not show any signs of having held cartridges with pointed bullets.
I am still curious as to what the box originally contained.



#8

I suppose it’s possible these are the original contents of the box if the folks who had the labels made ran afoul of the difference in “exerzierpatrone” in German and Austrian usage. That term means “dummy” in German German, but at one time it signified “blank” in Austria. If the same ambiguity exists in Czech (assuming Czech origin) or if the makers happened upon an Austrian-published German-English technical dictionary who knows what confusion could have resulted? JG


#9

Interesting excursion, JG, but we must not forget those boxes and ctgs were not made to be made. Instead they will have been made for a buyer who precisely expressed what he wanted - at least that’s the role I see myself once being customer.

I’m not a native English speaker but do have the impression the English language will not allow to use the one word for the other ctg!?


#10

[quote=“pbutler”]One thing is for certain. The rounds are definitely not dummies. They are a typical German Platzpatrone 33 loading. Here is one from the box.
The box, however, does not show any signs of having held cartridges with pointed bullets.
I am still curious as to what the box originally contained.


[/quote]

Sorry to ask but how did you pull the wooden bullet leaving it in perfect conditions?I have never been able to do a thing like this.I have found that wooden bullets are too light to be pulled by a bullet puller


#11

Pivi

I pulled it out with my hands. Kind of tough, but finally got it.


#12

I suggest only pulling these PP33 blanks apart if it is a specimen you don’t care about, that is, a duplicate. Once out, they never go back in the case satisfactorily, because you have usually scraped wood and reduced the diameter of the base of the bullet by squeezing it thru the drimp. that is my experience, anyway, having pulled a number of them. the first one was from my collection years ago, because I thought I could just push the bullet back in with no ill effect, and I wanted to see if it was true that they had some sort of over-powder wadding. The bullet went back in, but was so loose that even without anyone touching it, the bullet would flop about to a noticeable angle - it was no longer perfectly perpendicular.

Just a caution and my opinion. Would hate to see someone ruin one from his collection, especially one with a really good headstamp, as are often found on blanks.


#13

Hans: Yes in English “dummy” is understood to mean an inert cartridge containing no priming or powder of any sort. “Blank” indicates a loading of a chemical substance intended to produce noise and (in some cases) enough energy to cycle automatic arms. The term blank sometimes is extended to cartridges intended to propel grenades, but grenade cartridges, properly speaking, are loaded with a slow-burning propellant appropriate to discharging grenades. JG


#14

John,
I agree.If you can own loaded cartridges at home I suggest to leave them loaded.That mauser cartridge hasn’t got a very heavy crimp.Pulling the bullet leaving it in good conditions by hand or with a bullet puller is almost impossible with 6,5 x 52 carcano or 7,5 x 55 blank (wooden bullets ) loads,due their very heavy crimp