7,92x57 ex


#1

Found on the international meeting in landhorst a german dummy case.
I ask some collector friends to indentify this case but nobody has seen this case before.
Has anyone information concerning this case?

451kr.


#2

That is a very exciting find. I have never seen such a thing. My first impression was “so what! Its just a dfummy case that was not finished.” But then I rmembered that all exerzierpatyronen I have seen with this headstamp are one-piece, fluted dummies. that is, the bullet is formed right along with the case - it is not a separate component. This is not just a case of using the wrong headstamp buneter either, as the head of the case is formed with only the firing pin clearance dimple of a true exerzierpatrone. Incredible find. I have not seen it before. They evidently were experimenting at D.W.M. with making a full-weight, bulleted exerzierpatrone. Great item. Congratulations on the find.


#3

John,
Yes, I know that this kind of headstamp is only used with the fluted dummies.
The other two piece dummys are always made with a primer.
Maby there is an other collector that have the same case with this headstamp with bullet.
Otherwise it`s possible that this case was an experiment that never made it to mass production.

451kr.


#4

I can almost guaranteee that these cases were never used in serial production exerzierpatronen. I have been collecting this caliber for 15 years or more and have about 12,600 specimens. I have never seen this case before, and it is not found on the list that Willem Van Ejck and other German and international collectors put together of every known lot, date and loading of the German military 7.9 from 1888 until 1945. At least it is not listed in my copy of the list that is now about two years old. They have added a lot to the list, so I can’t say for sure it isn’t there now.

Had this reached serial production, and being a dummy round not tactical ammunition, some specimens of the finished product would be in collections. I don’t know of any, myself. I will hold to my opinion - that it is a remnant of an experiment by DWM to make a full-weight (that, is a full weight bullet instead of just a one piece brass cartridge with a hollow “bullet”) exerzierpatrone.

I think it is one very good find!


#5

I have never seen that “So” entry on a German headstamp before, what does it signify?


#6

The “dot” after the “S” seems to appear primarily (onl;y? on Exerzierpatronen of the fluted, one-piece variety. It replaces the star, and is sometimes seen as a period at the bottom of the letter “S” (S.) or as a “degree mark” (small circle) at the top of the “S” (S


#7

In the pictured h/s, the “So” is formatted exactly like the “Ex”. It appears to me to be a lower-case “o” and not a degree symbol. Is there another possible explanation?


#8

Is it not possible the S plus dot or S plus circle merely indicates brass of unknown or unstated percentage of copper, bearing in mind that the S* signifies 72% (or do I mean 67%?) copper content?


#9

[quote=“JohnMoss”]The “dot” after the “S” seems to appear primarily (onl;y? on Exerzierpatronen of the fluted, one-piece variety. It replaces the star, and is sometimes seen as a period at the bottom of the letter “S” (S.) or as a “degree mark” (small circle) at the top of the “S” (S


#10

Jon,

I agree with you that the circle is not formatted exactly like a “degree mark” but it also is not formatted exactly like a small letter “o” which I am sure it does not represent. The bottom of the “o” is not exactly on line with the bottom of the “S” while the bottom of the “x” is exactly on line with the bottom of the “E.” This is clearer on the two cartridges in my hand at this moment.

Admittedly, though, I thought it was higher, as the dots on the other headstamps (or the stars on a few of the fluted, one piece Ex.patr. 7.9s) are at the top of the “S.”

The use of the well-defined, formed “o” on other cartridges is reported on the headsamp list prepared primarily by my dear friend “Dutch” (Willem), but to be frank, I have never actually seen the “o” on a Polte cartridge, and have it only on two P28 cartridges from 1936 and 1939, replacing the “star” that appears on the same headstamp and cartridge type dated 1935. (Note that these are all actually two-digit dates - 35, 36, 39) as they appear on the cartridges). I wonder if some people have not reported a dot, while others, since the dot is round. have not reported the dot as an “o?”

Dutch - have you actually seen a polte round with the "


#11

[quote=“JohnMoss”]Jon,

I agree with you that the circle is not formatted exactly like a “degree mark” but it also is not formatted exactly like a small letter “o” which I am sure it does not represent. The bottom of the “o” is not exactly on line with the bottom of the “S” while the bottom of the “x” is exactly on line with the bottom of the “E.” This is clearer on the two cartridges in my hand at this moment.

Admittedly, though, I thought it was higher, as the dots on the other headstamps (or the stars on a few of the fluted, one piece Ex.patr. 7.9s) are at the top of the “S.”

The use of the well-defined, formed “o” on other cartridges is reported on the headsamp list prepared primarily by my dear friend “Dutch” (Willem), but to be frank, I have never actually seen the “o” on a Polte cartridge, and have it only on two P28 cartridges from 1936 and 1939, replacing the “star” that appears on the same headstamp and cartridge type dated 1935. (Note that these are all actually two-digit dates - 35, 36, 39) as they appear on the cartridges). I wonder if some people have not reported a dot, while others, since the dot is round. have not reported the dot as an “o?”

Dutch - have you actually seen a polte round with the "


#12

Dutch - my P28 Ex.patr. from 1936 does NOT have the star. It has the small "