7.92x57mm Huck Dummy


#1

Does anybody know anything about the dummy cartridge below such as who made it and when?

As you can see there is no headstamp on this cartridge and the case looks like it is two pieces joined at the base.

It looks like an action proving dummy.

I would appreciate any information.

Thank you.

Heavyiron


#2

No specific info close to hand, but it appears to be a West German dummy, by Huck Mfg. I’m sure someone will provide more details.


#3

So-called Hauck (or Huck?) dummy, West German post war. These were produced in some other configurations, but the 7.92x57 is by far the most commonly seen.

.


#4

Jon’s identification of this round is absolutely correct, but I have a little more information at hand. Firstly, there are at least four variations of this round: brass base with one knurled cannelure above extractor groove; brass base with one knurled cannelure above extractor groove and a pin thru that cannelure; brass base with two knurled cannelures above the extractor groove, and a pin thru the lower cannelure; steel base with two knurled cannelures above the extractor groove, and a pin thru the lower one. The steel base is very polished looking and may even be plated.

These were made circa 1951 by the firm of H. Huck, of N


#5

Since other calibers are mentioned, I will add that Huck made these dummies in .45 A.C.P., .30 Carbine, 7.62 x 51 NATO and .30-06. They have drawings for the same type in 9mm Parabellum, but I have never seen a specimen in that caliber.


#6

John

I have a 7.92x57 with a brass base with two knurled cannelures above the extractor groove, and a pin thru the lower cannelure. The two cannelures are not the same. The bottom is a very fine knurl and the top one is a course knurl. Any significance to that or is it standard?

Ray


#7

Ray - I don’t know. I would doubt that it has any significance. Mine is reversed by the way. On mine with brass base and two cannelures with a pin thru the lower one, the lower one is a coarse knurl and the upper one is a fine knurl. On the same variation with chrome-plated steel base, both are what I would call the coarse knurl. I would not place much importance on it, although if I had one with the kurling reversed, I probably would have kept it as a variation, albeit not an important one.


#8

Huck made them also in .50 BMG.
Beside that they also made the .50 BMG of red plastic with steel base (like the WWII types) and also one of translucent (clear) plastic with a steel rod going up to the shoulder.


#9

DR. Windisch / Brandt / Hamann gives in their book


#10

Here are some of the Huck dummies from my collection.
.30 M1 Carbine, 7.62x51, 3 different 7.92x57 and a 45 ACP.
2 of the 7.92s have brass bases but all the others shown have steel bases.
The .45 has 4 short vertical flutes


#11

craigt,
Your Carbine has 4 flutes also, right?
sam
(Carbine collector.)


#12

Yes it does, sorry I forgot to mention that


#13

Springfield Sporters had bunches of these available some years ago for about 15.00 per 100. I bought some to make up some MG34 belts for display. all the mentioned varieties were in the batch I got.

There is another variety not mentioned. 1 cannelure, no pin and the “bullet” and case are two seperate pieces.