7'92 mm Spr incendiary cartridges from spanish civil war


#1

These cartridges showed up in certain quantities during the spanish civil war of 1936-1939; they are not rare.

Incendiary Spr-type bullets (confirmed by x-rays).

1 - No headstamp, 3-stake primer, black annulus.

2 - V B q 38 headstamp, 3-stake primer, black annulus, 6-segment casemouth crimp.

3 - * VBq * 38 headstamp, 3-stake primer, red annulus, 6-segment casemouth crimp.

Does the bullet type denote german origin?

Does the asterisks on headstamp No. 3 denote austrian origin?

Any idea about the VBq code, and why the mixed upper/lower case?


#2

The German plants are indicated by the roman numeral in the headstamp i.e. I = P, II = P207, III = P186, IV = P154 and V = P345.

This comes from Willen van Eijk


#3

[quote=“pbutler”]The German plants are indicated by the roman numeral in the headstamp i.e. I = P, II = P207, III = P186, IV = P154 and V = P345.

This comes from Willen van Eijk


#4

A fourth style, but this time B V q 38.

Bullet looks like a sS. Gilding metal jacket, NON magnetic.


#5

Sorry…incorrect post. I was going to post some info, but read ‘7.62’ rather than ‘7.92’!


#6

In a newer listing Willem list 3 loadings with the B V q 38 (with the B at 9 O


#7

Phil - I think if you look carefully at the headings to each of these Spanish Civil War headstamps on Willems’s list, you will find he does show what the letters mean:

B: Polte
A: DWM
C: RWS
Etc.

The Roman numerals identify which activity falling under the various companys’ sphere of influence, the round was made at. For example, let’s take Polte (B):

I: P (Werk Magdeburg)
II: P207
III: P186
IV: P154
V: P345

The other numbers are basically the lot number and the year.

So, your box label you show is from the major Polte company, but with case made and loaded in the factory Silva Metallwerke G.m.b.H., at Genthin.

The only thing is don’t know from this is the exact relationship that “Parent Company” Polte had with the various factories using their headstamp “B” with the various Roman Numerals - outside ownership, war-time stewardship simply assigned by the Reich, major financial interest thru stock control, etc. With DWM and RWS, it is obvious. The factories represented by the Roman numerals are, in the case of those two, facilities of the parent company operated under DWM or RWS’s actual name (P120 was Dynamit A.-G., but they were the parent company for RWS and Geco, at least).


#8

John - thanks for clearing that up for me. I kind of had something like that in mind but I wasn’t sure.


#9

[quote=“pbutler”]In a newer listing Willem list 3 loadings with the B V q 38 (with the B at 9 O