8mm Ammo


#1

Can anyone enlighten me as to 8mm Russian ammo. I found it on this website and it’s not ringing any bells. Going to ring them tomorrow but can anyone tell me what it is.


#2

The label on the end of the packet (barely visible) is a typical Prvi-Partizan Yugoslav (now Serbian) label. So the ammo is 7,9mm (NOT “8mm Russian”),
and is in Serbo-Croat Cyrillic…nobody said Gundealers are necessarily experts…

Nothing New, after all it is the southern part of New Zealand…

regards,
Doc AV
Australia
BTW, looks like fairly new production, it may even be Noncorrosive…check Dates. (pre-1990s, Corrosive and Berdan:, after 1990s, with green primer seal, Boxer and Noncorrosive.


#3

The Germans left a great deal of 7.9x57 ammo , weapons and manufacturing equipment in the Yugoslav area after WW2. Much of this ammo has been repacked for sale including B-Patrones which have been reworked , pulled and repainted with silver tips , and other variations. Many thousands of rounds of this postwar rwwork and new made ammo has been imported into the US and sell for a few dollars a box. The B’s , of course , sell for much more but have only shown up in mixed lots. This Yugo 7.9 ammo is found at every gun show in the US and has been for several years. It is popular with the MG shooters. as the original German ammo is too expensive to shoot now.


#4

Rang the shop, they said it was most likley 7.92


#5

Like I said, Falcon 5 NZ, the dealer doesn’t know squat. And doesn’t want to admit it. Just get a reading of the headstamp… and a scan of the label.

As to Invercargill, I have been there…Very “south”, very Scottish (at least in 1970-71) and they speak a different English there as well.
From what I remember, the food was edible (Just), the Pubs closed early, and everything was closed on Sundays. and the weather was miserable, even for Mid-summer ( Christmas).

I still visit NZ occasionally, when Oz gets just too much for me… and Christchurch is my favourite “R&R city” ( Good antique shops, old books, radios, etc. and close to the good wine and cheese. I found a complete set of Mechanic’s Text Books used by Apprentice Mechanical Engineers back in the 1930s there at a book seller… Everything one needed to know to become a fully fledged Maritime Engineer or other mechanical calling (including Gunsmithing). Books originally owned by a retired merchant mariner. Seven Books in the set, A5 format, readily sized to each slip into your overcoat pocket or into your Lunch Box. They cover Properties of Materials, Fitting and Turning, Milling, Foundry work, basic Electrics, Wood, and Screw Thread Theory, and other useful information.

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics


#6

Doc

I know that OZ is a BIG place and you’re probably not affected, but want you to know that we are all thinking of you guys and the fires. Let’s hope the little bas***ds get hung on their own petard. Or if you catch them let me suggest that you take them out behind the barn and twist their nuts off.

Stay safe

Ray


#7

Dear Ray, I live in Brisbane ( North East Australia) and the Fires are in Victoria ( about 3000 kms away…like living in the Eastern USA with Fires in Cali.)

On the other hand, we do have an interest in the Flooding in the far north ( 100km south of Townsville, on the Burdekin Delta, where we have a riverside Sugar Plantation). The Flood waters have covered the cane up to a meter deep in some fields, but luckily the water is slow moving ( and now dropping finally) Last year during the “Wet”, we had a levee break, and some $50,000 damage to Crops, Pumps and the actual field layout, and the access road to the Farm house was washed away almost completely ( 1 mile ( 1,6km) of crushed rock base). Nothing much has happened this time, not even the ground floor of the House ( specifically built to avoid Flooding waters) had any water through it ( only the garage and our own “granny flat” (apartment) is downstairs, and raised at that; the manager’s residence is upstairs).
That distance to the Plantation is about 1300 kms away ( like Arizona to the Canadian Border…).

As to the Fire-lighters, they should re-introduce the Inquisition Penalty…Burning at the stake in the Public Square. But the massive death toll ( over 100 and still counting) and destruction of property is a combination of several (Human) factors…the idea that Bushland can grow close to (wooden) Houses, the lack of sufficient reserves of water, the lack of suitable “Fire cellars” (just like in the US Tornado belt, there were “storm cellars”) A Bush fire usually covers any particular area (especially if wind-driven,) in anything less than one hour…

And to start it all off, especially in the Firelighters case, the presence of “Litter overload” on the forest floor, the legacy of Greeny interference with regular annual Burn-off practices usually done in the cooler winter months.

The nature of Australia’s Eucalyptus forests is such that if there is little or no “Leaf Litter” on the forest floor, one cannot get a fire going that reaches to the tree tops, where the oil laden leaves then “explode” in flames which then leap from crown to crown, getting across firebrakes and travelling at racing car speeds (many of the Dead were found in burnt out cars, trying to outrun the flames.).
Also fields without trees, but lots of dried grass, burn just like US prairie fires, and about as fast. Fires spread by contiguous spread, and by “Spot fires” at a distance…Wind driven embers, some quite large, can be carries several kilometers for a well developed forestorm,and ignite areas well away from the fire front, creating a patchwork of flames, which eventually coalesce into one big firestorm, encircling any houses and people caught within the area ( a bit like paratroopers dropping surrounding a strong point.)
The embers also take hold of wooden houses quite readily ( Roof gutters full of leaf litter, open windows, no screens, exposed eaves allowing embers to blow into the Roof space, etc.)

Lightning is credited with a lot of the Victorian Bushfires, and of that one can do little, especially during a period of prolonged drought. but preventative measures could have mitigated the extent and severity of these fires…we have had them before, all over Australia ( about one disastrous Bush fire every four to five years) and it is obvious to Blind Freddy that building and living in a completely enclosed Forest area is a recipe for disaster, especially in Wooden frame houses, without sufficient preventative measures.
WE will now have a lot of wringing of hands by Politicians, and probably an Official Enquiry…already the Greenies are blaming “Climate change”, and not looking for the beam in their own eye…Proper Forest management and Housing management. And it will all carry on as before…burnt houses will be rebuilt,the dead will be buried, people will inhabit these areas, and inadequate measures otherwise taken by Government… until the next big firestorm/s…

Enough of this OT rant…

regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics,
Brisbane, Australia


#8

“Like I said, Falcon 5 NZ, the dealer doesn’t know squat. And doesn’t want to admit it”.

SEEMS TO BE A COMMON PROBLEM IN ALL COUNTRIES.


#9

[quote=“Ray Meketa”]Doc

I know that OZ is a BIG place and you’re probably not affected, but want you to know that we are all thinking of you guys and the fires. Let’s hope the little bas***ds get hung on their own petard. Or if you catch them let me suggest that you take them out behind the barn and twist their nuts off.

Stay safe

Ray[/quote]

CAN SOMEBODY OUT THERE HOSE RAY DOWN BEFORE HE CATCHES FIRE !