8mm Mauser headstamp?


#1



Please tell me which of the ammunition producer, if you can.


#2

It is Czech, from Povazske Strojarne.


#3

All of the entries on this headstamp have meaning; none are just decorative, as on some headstamps. The star indicates the case is made from brass. The single line indicates that the case has a single flash hole (although these are Berdan primed). The “9” is the month of the year and the “49” is the year the case was manufactured.

Jon was absolutely correct, as usual, on the manufacturer.


#4

Pov


#5

[quote=“JohnMoss”]All of the entries on this headstamp have meaning; none are just decorative, as on some headstamps. The star indicates the case is made from brass. The single line indicates that the case has a single flash hole (although these are Berdan primed). The “9” is the month of the year and the “49” is the year the case was manufactured.

Jon was absolutely correct, as usual, on the manufacturer.[/quote]
only one flash hole of Berdan primed?
no Boxer primed?


#6

Yes, P.S. is now in the Slovak Republic. Was that your question?


#7

thanks, now I’m no question.


#8

sorry, I have a question.
s.S. or S.m.E. ??


#9

Vz. 47 (S.m.E.)


#10

Wow! China! I knew the Chinese were huge stamp collectors. The USPS sends folks over there, with formidable supplies, for Stamp Conventions. You thought the SLICS was big! Can you imagine a stamp collector convention in Beijing!?!? Had no idea they were even allowed to possess ammunition. Wish I knew how to say WELCOME in Chinese.

Rick


#11

Well, China is widely underestimated.


#12

I was recently informed that possession of ammo is illegal in China. Considering everything that was made there and brought in (by friend and foe), the place could be a wonderland for ammo and gun collectors.


#13

Tiengulden - sorry to be so long in answering your question. I have been away from the house for awhile. Yes, the cartridge you show has only one flash hole, but is never-the-less Berdan primed. The anvil for the primer is part of the case and the flash hole is on one side of the anvil. During WWII, the Germans found that a single flash hole worked as well as two (I assume that they made the single flash hole slightly larger, but don’t know that for a fact), and they started the practice of marking the head of the cartridge with a dash (-) indicating the single hole. the Czech cartridge you have has a headstamp that is just a slight variation on the standard WWII German headstamping format.

Welcome to our website, by the way.

John Moss
IAA Secretary


#14

[quote=“slick rick”]Wow! China! I knew the Chinese were huge stamp collectors. The USPS sends folks over there, with formidable supplies, for Stamp Conventions. You thought the SLICS was big! Can you imagine a stamp collector convention in Beijing!?!? Had no idea they were even allowed to possess ammunition. Wish I knew how to say WELCOME in Chinese.

Rick[/quote]
I have only some pics.
possession of ammunition is illegal in here


#15


but I have some fired bullets.


#16

How are the flash holes made? Are they drilled or are they part of the original mould? I assume the original 2 hole configuration is to insure that at least one of them works. What kind of a cost savings may one derive from discarding one hole?


#17

Tiengulden - The best part of a hobby is the knowledge we gain from it. You can gain that from pictures, and from fired cases. I have many fired cases in my own collection, as well.

What is the headstamp on those 7.62 x 25mm cases you pictured? I am interested to know them. Aside from having this caliber in my collection, I have a very nice Chinese-made Type 54 pistol, as well as several forms of the 9 x 18mm Type 59 pistol. They are all very well made and shoot very well.

Can you post a picture of the headstamp or headstamps of those fired cases? Thank you.


#18

Since they’re made at the same time, and in the same way whether it’s one or two flash holes, I can’t imagine ANY cost savings, but I suppose having one flash hole would probably cut down slightly on the amount of “wastage” (cases that are drawn and headed, but are then found to have a broken, cracked, or separated anvil). For a Berdan case, the flash holes are usually punched at the same time the rest of the primer pocket is formed, and with a two-hole format, the anvil ends up sitting on a relatively small “island” in the middle of the pocket. If one or both of those flash holes are slightly out of place, it would probably make the case unusable, because it would probably make the anvil loose or bent.


#19

Regarding cost savings from single flash holes in Berdan-primed cases, everything I have read on why the Germans did this (and then were followed by other countries after the war, such as Czechoslovakia and Bulgaria, both of whom marked such cases in the same way as did the Germans) says it was to reduce “drill breakage” (which could also, perhaps, be interpretated as “punch breakage” since I believe flash holes are made both ways, depending on the case maker). Not being in the case-making business, I cannot comment on the sensibility of this, but I can say that a country involved in an exhausting war, short of production time and of materials of all kinds, doesn’t do such things for no reason at all. Therefore, I have to believe there was some cost or production-time (the time it takes to shut down and repair tooling - not the time it takes to punch or drill two holes rather than one, since two holes were undoubtedly punched simultaneously) benefit to doing what they did.

I cannot explain the reason for relatively current, commercial cartridges having one, two or three flash holes in Berdan-primed cartridges of the same make, and from the same box of ammunition, as I have in Sellier & Bellot fired cases in 9 x 18mm Makarov and 9mm Parabellum. There seems no reason for this other than poor quality control. If anyone has a different take on this different flash hole situation, I would like to hear it as it could solve another mystery.


#20

[quote=“JohnMoss”]Tiengulden - The best part of a hobby is the knowledge we gain from it. You can gain that from pictures, and from fired cases. I have many fired cases in my own collection, as well.

What is the headstamp on those 7.62 x 25mm cases you pictured? I am interested to know them. Aside from having this caliber in my collection, I have a very nice Chinese-made Type 54 pistol, as well as several forms of the 9 x 18mm Type 59 pistol. They are all very well made and shoot very well.

Can you post a picture of the headstamp or headstamps of those fired cases? Thank you.[/quote]
Sorry, I shot the photos is not clear.