8x50R Lebel "R.H.A.Co. 2-17"

Were these bullets turned on a lathe? Or those scratch marks something else?

Robin Hood Ammunition, Swanton (Vermont). It seems to be like the French ball D, but brass instead bronze. Can you disassemble it with a kinetic hammer?

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Hi, 
 Some US bullets (by scovill  Man.Co Connecticut) have 3 stages of turning), 

I see one pic about building date 1918 certainly on this forum or in IAA Bulletin .
hier it’s perhaps a collector test for cleaning bullet with turning machine …

Bsrg, Dan

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French building exemple


US Scovill 1918 exemple

Bsrg, Dan

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Balle D are NOT Bronze ( Copper +Tin) ; They are a Brass, ( Copper 90%, Zinc 10%) Incorrectly called
" Manufacturing Bronze"…
The formation of the Balle D is as shown, a combination of double heading, and then turning to eliminate the flash, and cut the crimping cannelure.
Followed by “butt stamping” the boat-tail base with factory ID and year details.
There is a video of a film from 1937 in France, which shows the making of Balle D, as well as the alternate Drilling of Berdan Flash holes in 7,5x54 M24/29 C cases.

I manufacture correct Balle D ( 1897 & 1920s Drawings) by CNC from 60/40 common Brass, giving a Bullet of 194.5 Grains, as against
Original Balle D of 197.5 grains.
The Mass difference is due to the
Density difference of the different alloys. Not that it affects shooting accuracy…at 200 yds, Target Patterns are similar for both. ( Original and CNC).
Doc AV
AVB TechServices, CNC Military Profile Projectiles.
Australia.
Edit: Correction above: " Copper 90%, Zinc 10%".

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Doc, maybe I am misunderstanding.
Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc (till to 50/50)
Bronze is an alloy of copper and tin (max 72/28).
I swear I was convinced that the French D balls were made of bronze :thinking:

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Hi, officiel document 1901.
S-009 S-010
So Brass (90 c,10z)
Bsrg, Dan

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I like this thing that you never stop learning.
Thanks to both of you :+1:t3:

The confusion seems to originate in terminology used in the U.S. copper industry.
Military specification MIL-C-21768A of 1971 says that copper alloy 220, containing 90 percent copper and 10 percent zinc (obviously a brass alloy) is also called “commercial bronze”.
I am relieved that copper alloy 210 (brass with 95 percent copper) is called “gilding” as expected.

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Hi, in french we often use current term “Tombac” for this bullet métal.
Bsrg, Dan

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The same in German: “Tombak” for English gilding.

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Actually, Tombac/k is a Javanese word, imported into Dutch, ( 1600s) and then spread throughout Europe to describe a reddish Brass used for making kitchen utensils etc, and eventually Bullet Jackets replacing the more expensive Cupro-Nickel
( “German silver” or “Pinchbeck”) which also caused high rates of Nickel Fouling in Rifle Barrels.
DocAV

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