8x56r odd round


#1

I HAVE HAD 2 CLIPS OF THESE FOR QUITE A WHILE. THOUGHT THEY WERE RELOADS WITH BRONZE TIP BULLETS BUT ON CLOSER EXAMINATION I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT THEY ARE THE TIPS ARE MAGNETIC.




THE CLIPS ARE VERY RUSTY BUT THEY LOOK LIKE THEY ARE MARKED WITH AN A


#2

Target Pratice Cartridge 31M (Hongrie)


#3

The clips are likely marked with the “AH” intertwined monagram that also appears on the headstamp. It stands
for “Allámi Hadiánággyár” which is the name of the factory at Csepel (near Budapest), Hungary, that made them.

At least, I have seen 8 x 56R clips with the “AH” logo.


#4

IIRC this bullet is designed to break up on impact and eliminate ricochets on training ranges. The combination of a weak jacket and three piece core causes the bullet to disintgrate on impact.


#5

[quote=“JohnMoss”]The clips are likely marked with the “AH” intertwined monagram that also appears on the headstamp. It stands
for “Allámi Hadiánággyár” which is the name of the factory at Csepel (near Budapest), Hungary, that made them.

At least, I have seen 8 x 56R clips with the “AH” logo.[/quote]

Along with ‘ML’ these ‘AH’ marked clips often only have badly stamped or partial markings, I suppose it never crossed anyone’s mind that there would be folk collecting the things at some point in the future.

Here’s a clearly marked example;

Happy collecting, Peter


#6

…deleted my half correct posting…


#7

That Hungarian round is designated 8 mm 31 M. céllövő élestöltény and is loaded with the Austrian model of the target practice bullet (8 mm M. 30 Scheibengeschoss used in the 8 mm M. 30 Scheibenpatrone). The Austrian version has a gilding metal clad steel jacket, brass ojive and lead core divided in four parts. The other variation developed in Hungary is loaded with a gilding metal clad steel jacket with exposed lead core (also divided in four parts).


#8

THANK YOU FOR THE INFO I WAS WAY OFF TRACK ON THIS ROUND.