8x60R cases


#1

A friend, with more faith in me than is perhaps justified, has asked me if I know of anybody who is currently making 8x60R cases. He has found a picture on the internet of a modern looking boxer primed case but can’t read the headstamp. Possibly AC (AO AG?)

I said I didn’t know but I had access to probably the best forum for this sort of information in the world, and would ask.


#2

[quote=“VinceGreen”]A friend, with more faith in me than is perhaps justified, has asked me if I know of anybody who is currently making 8x60R cases. He has found a picture on the internet of a modern looking boxer primed case but can’t read the headstamp. Possibly AC (AO AG?)

I said I didn’t know but I had access to probably the best forum for this sort of information in the world, and would ask.[/quote]

Do you mean:
8x60R or 8x60RS Cases (the RS is for the 323 bullets) , or 8x60R Guedes/Kropatschek??
The case you probably saw in the net with that hs was possible from cartouches Sologne.
They have at least made in 2012 still the 8x60RS ammo.
See here:
cartouches-sologne.fr/upload … alogue.pdf

Greetings
Forensic


#3

What sort of rifle does your friend have? The 8X60R Kropatchek is generally used in the various 19th Century Portuguese Kropatschek bolt-action military carbines and rifles. About 40 years ago there were lots of those rifles sold cheaply on the US market, but most I saw were in poor condition. They are seldom seen at present. I think there are some custom loaders selling formed 8X50R Kropatschek brass and maybe even loaded ammunition.


#4

Thanks for that information, Its extremely useful. Yes its a Portugese Kropatschek, I don’t know where he got it from. There is a big market in obsolete calibres over here because they are the only rifles and pistols that can be bought and kept legally by collectors without having to go through all the paperwork.

The collectors are not allowed to shoot them but there are also people like us who do shoot all the vintage stuff. We still have to go through all the paper work unfortunately, even for an exempt calibre.

The size of the collectors market means there are often oddball rifles like this available from small time dealers. Somebody has probably been to Portugal and bought up a load. You can drive to Portugal from Britain in a day. It would be a hard day’s drive but by putting them in your car and driving them back you by-pass all the shipping red tape.


#5

[quote=“VinceGreen”]Thanks for that information, Its extremely useful. Yes its a Portugese Kropatschek, I don’t know where he got it from. There is a big market in obsolete calibres over here because they are the only rifles and pistols that can be bought and kept legally by collectors without having to go through all the paperwork.

The collectors are not allowed to shoot them but there are also people like us who do shoot all the vintage stuff. We still have to go through all the paper work unfortunately, even for an exempt calibre.

The size of the collectors market means there are often oddball rifles like this available from small time dealers. Somebody has probably been to Portugal and bought up a load. You can drive to Portugal from Britain in a day. It would be a hard day’s drive but by putting them in your car and driving them back you by-pass all the shipping red tape.[/quote]

Ammunition (0ld stocks ) showing up from time to time. They where sold ones by Frankonia and Hege as Surplus ammo.
Newly fabricated cases are made by Horneber Fuerth (Fürth) in Germany and distributed by Reimer Johannsen .
you can find his offers on cases here:
johannsen-jagd.de/data_de/ka … uelsen.pdf
Prices are in Euro…
if you scroll down in the list, you will find the 8x60R Krop. Cases…
Unfortunatelly the cases have NOT the thick base as the originals and most of them will not fire, as the firing pin will push the case forwards into the chamber and giving not enough resistance to give a sure ignition People told me. You can help you with a small disc (put over the ammo from the front) or also sometimes a rubberband from deloading hammers where used, pulled over from the front and Holding that case more backwards…)

The cases are not always in stock and it takes its time to get them…They are Boxer primed empty cases.
The originals using a large Diameter (.25) Berdan primer…Most of the originals from 1900 to about 1922 still fires ok…

Good luck
PP Forensic


#6

Vince,

Not sure this will help you, Buffalo Arms sells 8x60 K brass,they do ship international. You would have to contact them about case (reformed parent or a basic case, etc.)

Here’s a link to the catalog page http://www.buffaloarms.com/8x56r_Kropatchek_Reloading_Brass_it-157879.aspx?CAT=3829


#7

[quote=“VinceGreen”]
The size of the collectors market means there are often oddball rifles like this available from small time dealers. Somebody has probably been to Portugal and bought up a load. You can drive to Portugal from Britain in a day. It would be a hard day’s drive but by putting them in your car and driving them back you by-pass all the shipping red tape.[/quote]
I would think this would be a bad idea. You would have to drive into Spain and possibly France. The rifles would probably be illegal there.


#8

If fired Berdan military cases can be located, they can be reloaded. I have done this by drilling out the primer/primer pocket to fit a shotgun battery cup primer. Works fine for low-pressure BP or very mild smokeless loads. I think Buffalo arms also sells the proper diameter bullets, but I have successfully used just regular 8mm-S jacketed military bullets which are a little smaller in diameter than what the Kropatschek uses.

By the way, the Kropatschek rifle is essentially identical (except for cosmetics and caliber) to the Mauser 71/84. I think most if not all were made by Steyr in Austria back in the 1880s.


#9

I have passed on all the information and my friend was greatly impressed by your knowledge, he asked me to say thank you.