9.4 mm dutch revolver


#1

I’m a little bit lost with the differents kinds of cartridges used with this revolver (straighted or bottlenecked cases)
when was the bottlenecked case was adopted?
Is it possible to use the two cartridges in the same revolver?
I have a straight case headstamped D 38 and a bottlenecked case headstamped S 27 (so it seems that the straighted case was still in production whereas the bottlenecked case already exist).
Which kind of case have the oldest headstamp known?
Laurent


#2

[quote=“laurent”]I’m a little bit lost with the differents kinds of cartridges used with this revolver (straighted or bottlenecked cases)
when was the bottlenecked case was adopted?
Is it possible to use the two cartridges in the same revolver?
I have a straight case headstamped D 38 and a bottlenecked case headstamped S 27 (so it seems that the straighted case was still in production whereas the bottlenecked case already exist).
Which kind of case have the oldest headstamp known?
Laurent[/quote]

still nobody have new informations on this tread?


#3

Some information here: viewtopic.php?f=8&t=12050&hilit=9.4mm+Dutch


#4

Another one of those confused situations involving 2 different cartridges per the viewtopic listed above.

FWIW

From Manual of Pistol and Revolver Cartridges, Vol. 1, Erlmeier & Brandt, 1967. On pages 183 – 184 is the listing for the 9.4mm Dutch with seven different bulleted cartridges shown. Two of the seven cartridges have obvious shoulders but differ in shoulder height. The other cartridges appear to have straight cases with no shoulder. They list the cartridge as being for a revolver adopted by the Dutch army in 1873 and may be listed as the M1873 or M1874 Dutch revolver. Case length is listed as being between 19.96mm and 21mm; bullet diameter is listed as 9.67mm to 10.2mm.

Also from Erlmeier & Brandt, page 190, is the 10mm Soerabaja (10mm Scherpe Patroon No. 3, P.W.S. No.3; P.W.S. = Pyrotechnische Werkplants Soerabaja).
Two cartridges are pictured, one with a shorter case and round nose bullet (date stamp in the bullet is 9). The second cartridge has a longer case with flat nosed bullet (the date stamp in the bullet is illegible). Case length is listed as 23.3mm to 27.2mm and bullet diameter is listed as 9.67mm to 10.2mm. They describe the cartridge as being for a revolver adopted by the Dutch East Indies, no date given. From Wikipedia: Surabaya (Indonesian pronunciation: [surəˈbaja]) (formerly Soerabaja, Soerabaia or Surabaja) is Indonesia’s second-largest city.

In Erlmeier & Brandt there is no listing for a 10.4mm Dutch or Soerbaja cartridge.

From Centerfire Pistol and Revolver Cartridges, Vol. 1, White, Munhall & Bearse, 1967: they only cover the 9.4mm Dutch cartridge (pages 56 & 57) pretty much following the line of information presented in Erlmeier & Brandt, they including silhouettes of straight cased and shouldered cartridges.

Both books give an alternative listing for the 9.4mm Dutch as the 10x20mm Dutch.

Another source of info for the 9.4mm Dutch is: militarycartridges.nl/dutch/ … /9,4mm.htm

Brian


#5

[quote=“bdgreen”]Another one of those confused situations involving 2 different cartridges per the viewtopic listed above.

Another source of info for the 9.4mm Dutch is: militarycartridges.nl/dutch/ … /9,4mm.htm

Brian[/quote]

According to the website you mentionned above, the cases were made outside of the country but that still not explain why in the thirties they were still used both straight and bottlenecked cases.
Laurent


#6

The answer to the question of the bottleneck cartrdidges is fairly simple: Nobody knows.
I know some Dutch collectors who did a great deal of research in the state archives, and they didn’t found the answer.


#7

[quote=“EMZ”]The answer to the question of the bottleneck cartrdidges is fairly simple: Nobody knows.
I know some Dutch collectors who did a great deal of research in the state archives, and they didn’t found the answer.[/quote]

Thank you for this information, maybe one day somebody will find a document,who knows…