9 mm ID

According the former owner, this should be a Swedish dummy. Swedish, OK. Karlsborg Arsenal, I presume. Magnetic bullet. Dummy, OK, looking to the “primermarks”. But why? Has it something to do with the other headstamp-markings?

looks as it the primer may have been lightly struck or hit with something to create the light dents, could perhaps been from storage or handling? Perhaps even dirt on the primer seating tooling? Nothing to do with the headstamp.

For what it’s worth, mine shows the same very light dents, dimples, ripples, whatever you wish to call it.

Thanks, Pete. I shall definitely not try it out.

It is, or certainly should be an inert Swedish drill / dummy, so I’m not sure what you mean by “try it out”?

I have a couple of cartridges in my collection that were or likely were police issue. Both of these rounds have primers that look a good deal like this one, and I decided years ago they got that appearance from being chambered on multiple occasions without being fired. One was an FMJ US-made .30-30, and the other was a .43 Egyptian Remington. Jack

In the case of this particular Swedish drill round (possibly a box-maker’s dummy or armourer’s dummy, since it is not the pattern Standard for the Swedish Military), I have had many of these go through my hands. Most were brand new and obviously never had been in a firearm. Most all of the primers on the ones I have had look just like the one pictured in this thread. It may be that reject primer cups were used, or any of most of the causes so far postulated. Certainly, though, the marks on the primer are of no importance. This same round, by the way, is found with the entire bullet lacquered green (same “53” headstamp from Karlsborg), but lack the two case-cannelures associated with the standard military dummy. As I recall, these also have a full-weight bullet, where most of the Swedish military drill rounds have an empty bullet jacket with a wood spacer that fills the jacket and the powder chamber of the case, or in the latter ones, an anodized-green solid-aluminum “bullet” that has the tail for preventing set-back in use as an integral part of the projectile. For a neutral country, it is amazing how many varieties of 9 mm Para Sweden has produced, including dummies.
They are a mini-collection unto themselves, if one were to save every date, especially. For the collector, a fascinating selection and overall, quite colorful.

Ok, well then, how do you know the thing is innocent without trying it in your gun?

See: amkat.se/index.php?Env=Ammo& … lue_B=Pack Test&Menu_Name=Pack test & choose " Pack test ’ in the left hand column.

Quote from the above listed page- “The pack test cartridge is used by the factory to trim their packing machinery. Therefore it is a copy of the standard cartridge with no powder or live primer. It is differentiated from live cartridges by being fully chromed.”

Brian

Well I guess I could answer that by saying that the various drill / dummies of various countries have standards to be met that proclaim them to be as such. The chrome plating, blackening, or other case-surface treatment, holes, hollow (no core) bullets, case grooves or flutes, primer treatments: strikes, holes, plating or lack of a primer, blind primer pockets, any number of factors / treatments which are a deviant to normal production serve to note the inert status of a round from a specific country.

As John notes above “This same round, by the way, is found with the entire bullet lacquered green (same “53” headstamp from Karlsborg), but lack the two case-cannelures associated with the standard military dummy. As I recall, these also have a full-weight bullet, where most of the Swedish military drill rounds have an empty bullet jacket with a wood spacer that fills the jacket and the powder chamber of the case, or in the latter ones, an anodized-green solid-aluminum “bullet” that has the tail for preventing set-back in use as an integral part of the projectile.

Dummies / inert rounds are made for a variety of reasons. Testing packaging (as Brian notes abve), gun function, sales samples, product display on boards or for shows, training, and several other reasons which don’t immediately come to mind. Oh yeah, to drive collectors crazy?