9mm Steyr Cartridge - Geco - FMJ Are they rare?


#1

9mm Steyr Cartridge - Geco - FMJ Are they rare?
I have 23 boxes of 16 bullets per box given to me and I would like to find out if they are rare or desired so I might sell some of them. I am sure they were made before WWII and the boxes are in different shape as some are open and others are still sealed. The two main question I have is are there collectors out there for these and what price range would there be for sealed boxes and un-sealed boxes. Oh yes and they have a stripper clip on the bullets.

This isn’t like my Jap 7.7 that I can find a good deal of info on.

i1104.photobucket.com/albums/h33 … inoxid.jpg


#2

Am not trying to give a smart aleck answer, just an honest one. Your possession of 23 boxes of a specific type of cartridge would, in my opinion, rule out the use of the word “rare” of itself.
That’s a lot of ammo if one is considering the single-specimen collector, and probably enough for half the collectors of full boxes in that caliber in America.

However, regardless of that, these boxes, if they are of the “green label” type, are relatively common in the USA, as a great deal of this ammunition came to America about twenty years ago or so, probably along with the Chilean-Crested Steyr-Hahn Model 1912 pistols. A couple fo other styles of box that were reare in the US before that also came in from that country, including 50-round German and 16-round Chilean boxes from FAMAE.

The Geco box I am talking is labeled as follows (I have not attempted to duplicate the spacing of the letters, or their font):

16
Patronen für Selbstlade-Pistolen
"Steyr" 9 m/m
auf Ladestreifen Ganzmantel-Geschoss
Gustav Genschow & Co., Actiengesellschaft
Durlach (Germany)

The end labels say:

Geco
SINOXID

There is a back label as welljust basically telling about the ammo being non-corrosive and patented in all countries (in German, of course).

I cannot help you on values, but although fairly common, I am sure the boxes still have value
probably slightly higher than just surplus shooting ammo, especially the ones in best condition, and if they have the clips still on the ammo (If the boxes I am thinking of).


#3

When you want to know a rough value on a box of ammo, you could search Gunbroker’s advanced search under ammunition for whatever it is. Although not always 100% accurate, if you search several auctions, as well as closed auctions, you can get a good idea of what things sell for (making note of condition issues as well as box & cartridge variation types). There’s a guy here selling those boxes for $25.00 per box, which seems correct:
http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=230967569


#4

That wasn’t a smart aleck answer more than a real world one. I am good with that.

One can’t know what something is without asking or looking around. A quick search came up with little outside tech data but it did lead me here. As I had never heard of this type of gun before, I though I should at least ask those that might know better than I.

Thank you both.


#5

halflock - thank you for your answer. I always worry, because am sometimes too blunt with my answers (am a cranky 72 year old) and they are sometimes misunderstood with hurt feelings resulting (my fault in most cases for expressing myself to brusquely). The Steyr boxes are lovely and I am glad I have one in my collection. Not often you get a chance to buy a mint box from pre-WWII.