9x19 "Radially Dynamic" Devel Bullet


#1

I just stumbled across this article:

thegunzone.com/people/charlie_kelsey2.html

Anybody here who has ever seen one of those projectiles or cartridges. Were they ever usefull or adopted by some LE agency or had the patent been bought by a large ammunition manufacturer?


#2

Interesting article and bullet design.
Too bad about Mr. Kelsey :(


#3

You used to be able to buy the unloaded projectiles in the U.S. many years ago, but only for a short time. I don’t believe any commercial loading of these ever occurred, but I do have a few in .45 auto - no special headstamps though, just commercial PMC, WIN, R-P, etc. from a small loading outfit probably.


#4

Matt, thanks for the info!


#5

Some years back I had a very similar idea, but for rifle bullets. Fortunately for me, I didn’t sink any time or treasure into its development. The M973 bullet for the 7.62X51mm uses much the same type of fluted nose design to reduce bullet stability, but for a completely different application. So, if the Devel bullet worked so well, I wonder why no one has picked up on it since?


#6

Aren’t there plenty of various frangibles today? Just without such a spectacular design.


#7

It’s not just the frangibility. The grooves/fins on the nose provide resistance to spin, reducing its angular momentum and causing destabilization and tumbling in dense tissue. Typical frangible pistol bullets have round or flat noses, don’t expand or fragment in tissue, and don’t tumble. The idea of Devel bullets was to have frangibility for prevention of ricochets, environmental reasons (no lead), and to be easier on bullet traps. and to provide a bullet that ALSO would destabilize and tumble in tissue for lethality. Frangible ammunition’s main purpose is for training use, not gunfights. Devel could do both (theoretically at least).

To clarify, the bullets do not tumble end-over-end. Rather they exhibit considerable yaw in the target. That same effect is useful in many FMJ military rifle bullets also, except those bullets usually break up into secondary fragments under the yaw forces.