A beautiful Russian 7.62x54R box


#1

While its condition is not the best, this is a gorgeous box - the angel appears to be three dimensional. It is one of my favorites and, like the 9x54R on another thread, probably not intended for export. Most of the Russian boxes I have were picked up at a Moscow shooting range; some appear to have been exposed to the elements for some time and are a bit mis-shapened like this one. I plan to steam it with a wood block inside to see if I can get it straightened out.


#2

Could you go to a gun show and get a new one? Are there any gun shows at all?


#3

No, at least in American sense
Gun & ammo trade is highly restricted and regulated here in Russia, and you can buy live ammo only in specialized gunshops and only in caliber you have registered guns for.


#4

I am beyond amazed at the turn of situation in Russia regarding guns and ammo. When I traveled to the Soviet Union in the 70s even the black marketeers were afraid to even have fired cases found in the woods. NOW , folks can collect guns and ammo. WOW !

They are producing good low cost export ammo and are virtually dominating the gun show shooting ammo business. The boxes shown here recently are very attractive and artistic work.

The old saying is " live long enough and you will see everything ".

I never expected to see this !


#5

Unfortunately, Russian Customs has really cracked down on inert cartridges sent through the mail. Prior to about four months ago, they were allowed in, with the biggest problem being the lack of dependable mail service which I have been told could result in packages being lost. I found that by using international priority mail and registering the packages, it was pretty much guaranteed the packages would be safely delivered to the addressee. Now with the crackdown by customs, nothing is getting through. The upside of this is that they tend to return the packages to the sender rather than seizing them.


#6

This is certainly bad news. Any idea why the change ?


#7

When I lived in the USSR, I had a Czech made air pistol and I thought it was a “capital crime” (brought it from Brno over the border in a car). I could not dream of having 7.62x54R. Viva progress!!!


#8

This summer Russia joined the ‘customs union’ with Belarussia and Kazakhstan. Now, there are common rules which are the lowest common denominator and in this case, i believe, the rules are drawn to Belorussian standards. Which DO NOT allow any gun or ammunition parts to be sent via mail.
Prior to that, only major gun parts (i.e. barrels, receivers, bolts), live rounds and explosives (powder & primers) were restricted.

It is still legal to buy deactivated ammo, unloaded bullets, and spare gun parts like stocks and bring them in country in your own luggage, but NOT in the mail.

The expedited services can be exempt from this rule, but good luck talking the clerk on the reception to accept for shipment something that looks as bad as a ‘bullet’, even if it is completely inert :(


#9

That is bad news.


#10

It not truth. They don’t cracked cartridges, they steal them.

The Belarus laws are identical to the Russian. I think that the new union only an occasion to make laws more cruel.

Yes, I have idea. I have written the letter to customs and HAVE demanded to identify inert cartridges. The customs is obliged it to make. If they tell that it is inert cartridges - I will show this letter on mail and I will demand to stop to brake my parcels. If will tell that it is live cartridges - I will write the complaint to Office of Public Prosecutor and I will accuse customs of infringement of the Russian laws.


#11

You folks have real nerve punching the bear. Picking a fight with those folks sounds like real trouble to me. Is Siberia still there ?


#12

It is!

One of the problems in Russia (and former USSR) is that people can not afford to demand their rights (financially and against personal opinions of half criminal officials) not to mention that people there are not used to do so (mentality of old days). And if one dares to do so the “officials” get upset by the pure fact and do their very personal best to teach that citizen a lesson. Almost nobody (citizen) there is willing or able to face the consequences from all this. Life there is difficult enough without this kind of self caused misery.
This is the view of 99% of the ammo researchers I know there.


#13

Simply I obstinate also hate customs officers. Siberia on a place, and here modern Russian prison:
liveleak.com/view?i=704_1288642818


#14

[quote=“EOD”]It is!

One of the problems in Russia (and former USSR) is that people can not afford to demand their rights (financially and against personal opinions of half criminal officials) not to mention that people there are not used to do so (mentality of old days). And if one dares to do so the “officials” get upset by the pure fact and do their very personal best to teach that citizen a lesson. Almost nobody (citizen) there is willing or able to face the consequences from all this. Life there is difficult enough without this kind of self caused misery.
This is the view of 99% of the ammo researchers I know there.[/quote]

That describes more than Russia.

When I traveled to the Soviet Union part of my mission was to develope black market contacts. I did that and got to know many serious blackmarketeers. As a collector of ordnance I was always after the same. NONE of the blackmarket folks wanted any part of that. The only ammo related items which I obtained were given to me by museum officals ( and sometime confiscated on the way out ) or dummy shotshells which I was able to buy in stores. I tried to buy training hand grenades in the huge military stores in Moscow and Leningrad but was refused. I had a local buy them for me. They did not make it past the uniformed KGB at the air port.

I bought out one fine item which was given to me by the director of the Central Army Museum in Moscow .

The changes in Russia are amazing. None of the serious folks who I knew there had any interest in challenging the authorities.

TO CONFORM WITH LEGAL GUIDELINES I HAVE TO SAY THAT NONE OF THE PREVIOUS IS TRUE.