A few bullets for id please


#1

I wonder if anyone can help id a few of my rounds please.

  1. is a wooden 20mm dummy painted matt black. when I bought this I was told it was ex RAF. I have not seen any literature to say the RAF used wooden 20mm Dummys. However I have read that the Royal Navy used them. After rubbing a little dust into the head the following is visible. O.E D.II.N W&P

  2. I have two K-18 303 cases but one has an extra - before the Z. what does this dash mean? Also on the case with the dash it looks like that it was once chemically blackened from the head to a depth of 14 mm or .055 of a inch.


  3. Is a 7.92 case by Peters headstamp = PC 40 1Z I have seen a single Z on the head stamp but not a 1Z. can anyone tell me the meaning of the 1 on the stamp please.

  4. A headstamp of B T 3 39 On Curtis Steinhauer cd i can not tell the difference between a round with this haedstamp from one shown for Yugoslavia and Switzerland.

  5. I bought this round from a French collector, Its obviously a battlefield dug bullet. The bullet does not look like it has been pulled. I have been told that this round should have a wooden bullet. So my question is should this case have a ball or wooden bullet?


#2

Info on #1: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=897 , towards middle of page 4.

#3 “These are contract rounds manufactured by Pouderie et Cartouche Helene in Greece for Great Britain in 1940 The “Iz” means ball Mark I loaded with nitro-cellulose powder.” viewtopic.php?f=1&t=1014.
Cartridge S.A. Ball 7.92mm Mark Iz from Tony Edwards’ web site-
sites.google.com/site/britmilammo/7-92mm-besa

#4 is Yugoslavian see: [7.9mm loadings and headstamps of yugoslavia) . The letters in the HS are Cyrillic.


#3

We had a #1 in our sale 8 lot 752 & it was thought to be New Zealand Air Force issue and British in origin.
It was headstamped ’ OE D. II N W&JRT 1942 and lot 753 had another variation which was unpainted, with a broad arrow stamped near the head, and a different headstamp with a 1943 date


#4

[quote=“PetedeCoux”]We had a #1 in our sale 8 lot 752 & it was thought to be New Zealand Air Force issue and British in origin.
It was headstamped ’ OE D. II N W&JRT 1942 and lot 753 had another variation which was unpainted, with a broad arrow stamped near the head, and a different headstamp with a 1943 date[/quote]

OE = Oerlikon; D II N = Drill Mark II, Naval; W&JRT = Manufacturer, 1942 = date.

gravelbelly


#5

#2. VII - Z. This was obviously intended to be loaded as a Ball, Mark 7, loaded with nitrocellulose powder, however there doesn’t appear to have been any stab crimps on the neck, which would be usual for that period. Apart from being from a different bunter, I have no idea if the - means anything special.
If there are no signs of bullet crimping, I would be looking for alternate uses of the case. During this time Grenade cartridges and similar used ball cases, and other than an open neck, closed with a wad, seem to be lacking positive identification. One which does come to mind is the Cartridge, S.A. Trench Howitzer Mark 1. This looked like a grenade cartridge, but with the lower half of the case blackened. That is only my best guess.


#6

5#

This round was original loaded as a blank and therefor would have a wooden bullet.
Same round is also know as a sS ( schweres Spitsgeschoss ) round but would have a green primer annulus and would have primer crimps.

451kr.


#7

Here a link for your #5 cartridge: viewtopic.php?f=8&t=11756


#8

The 20x110 Oerlikon Mk II Drill cartridge made of wood was approved for Naval Service in December 1940. This example was made by W. & J. R. Thompson Ltd. in Yorkshire, England.


#9

Well guys thanks alot, my tv round I will pull the bullet and post the pics…paul


#10

The late Tony Edwards told me that the dashes on the Kynoch 1918 .303 headstamps indicated which production line within the factory they were made on.


#11

Thanks Falcon, Really useful piece of information and often difficult to find.