A few bullets for id please

I wonder if anyone can help id a few of my rounds please.

  1. is a wooden 20mm dummy painted matt black. when I bought this I was told it was ex RAF. I have not seen any literature to say the RAF used wooden 20mm Dummys. However I have read that the Royal Navy used them. After rubbing a little dust into the head the following is visible. O.E D.II.N W&P

  2. I have two K-18 303 cases but one has an extra - before the Z. what does this dash mean? Also on the case with the dash it looks like that it was once chemically blackened from the head to a depth of 14 mm or .055 of a inch.


  3. Is a 7.92 case by Peters headstamp = PC 40 1Z I have seen a single Z on the head stamp but not a 1Z. can anyone tell me the meaning of the 1 on the stamp please.

  4. A headstamp of B T 3 39 On Curtis Steinhauer cd i can not tell the difference between a round with this haedstamp from one shown for Yugoslavia and Switzerland.

  5. I bought this round from a French collector, Its obviously a battlefield dug bullet. The bullet does not look like it has been pulled. I have been told that this round should have a wooden bullet. So my question is should this case have a ball or wooden bullet?

Info on #1: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=897 , towards middle of page 4.

#3 “These are contract rounds manufactured by Pouderie et Cartouche Helene in Greece for Great Britain in 1940 The “Iz” means ball Mark I loaded with nitro-cellulose powder.” viewtopic.php?f=1&t=1014.
Cartridge S.A. Ball 7.92mm Mark Iz from Tony Edwards’ web site-
sites.google.com/site/britmilammo/7-92mm-besa

#4 is Yugoslavian see: [7.9mm loadings and headstamps of yugoslavia) . The letters in the HS are Cyrillic.

We had a #1 in our sale 8 lot 752 & it was thought to be New Zealand Air Force issue and British in origin.
It was headstamped ’ OE D. II N W&JRT 1942 and lot 753 had another variation which was unpainted, with a broad arrow stamped near the head, and a different headstamp with a 1943 date

[quote=“PetedeCoux”]We had a #1 in our sale 8 lot 752 & it was thought to be New Zealand Air Force issue and British in origin.
It was headstamped ’ OE D. II N W&JRT 1942 and lot 753 had another variation which was unpainted, with a broad arrow stamped near the head, and a different headstamp with a 1943 date[/quote]

OE = Oerlikon; D II N = Drill Mark II, Naval; W&JRT = Manufacturer, 1942 = date.

gravelbelly

#2. VII - Z. This was obviously intended to be loaded as a Ball, Mark 7, loaded with nitrocellulose powder, however there doesn’t appear to have been any stab crimps on the neck, which would be usual for that period. Apart from being from a different bunter, I have no idea if the - means anything special.
If there are no signs of bullet crimping, I would be looking for alternate uses of the case. During this time Grenade cartridges and similar used ball cases, and other than an open neck, closed with a wad, seem to be lacking positive identification. One which does come to mind is the Cartridge, S.A. Trench Howitzer Mark 1. This looked like a grenade cartridge, but with the lower half of the case blackened. That is only my best guess.

5#

This round was original loaded as a blank and therefor would have a wooden bullet.
Same round is also know as a sS ( schweres Spitsgeschoss ) round but would have a green primer annulus and would have primer crimps.

451kr.

Here a link for your #5 cartridge: viewtopic.php?f=8&t=11756

The 20x110 Oerlikon Mk II Drill cartridge made of wood was approved for Naval Service in December 1940. This example was made by W. & J. R. Thompson Ltd. in Yorkshire, England.

Well guys thanks alot, my tv round I will pull the bullet and post the pics…paul

The late Tony Edwards told me that the dashes on the Kynoch 1918 .303 headstamps indicated which production line within the factory they were made on.

Thanks Falcon, Really useful piece of information and often difficult to find.