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#2
  • It seems to be a very light AT gun, perhaps a 25mm [?] one. Are you sure those soldiers are Romanians??? They could be from Finland. Liviu 03/18/07

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The Romanians used during WW2 these AT guns [I’ll mention only the 25mm, 37mm and 47mm models since that gun from the photo isn’t a larger caliber]: 25mm Puteaux AT gun M1937; 37mm Bofors AT gun M1936; 47mm Breda or 47mm Bohler AT guns [both M1935] and the 47mm Schneider AT gun M1936. NONE of these AT guns look like the gun from the picture posted above. Liviu 03/18/07


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#7

The soldier who operates that unknown AT gun [see photo] does not have the standard “Dutch helmet” used by the Romanian troops during WW2. Almost all the AT guns used by the Romanian Army during WW2 were of foreign manufacture. One exception is the “75mm Resita” gun which could be used as AT or AA gun. Liviu 03/18/07


#8

The gun has been identified. Yes you are correct in that Romania as an axis country received a variety of weapons from various countries allied with the Germans including Vichy France, Austria and,of course, various types of obsolete weapons which were captured by the German army and were not wanted by them or the SS. Romania was allied with Germany from Oct 1940 to Aug 1944 when it was occupied by the Soviet Union. Romania then switched sides and fought against Germany in the final battles of the war allied with the Soviet army and with a variety of weapons and materiel support provided by the Soviets including captured German weapons .

An excellent short history of the subject can be seen at :

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romania_du … rld_War_II


#9
  • Well, what type of gun was it, what country made it and what caliber was it??? For those interested in the artillery pieces used by the Romanian Army during WW2, please enter here at —> worldwar2.ro and click on “weapons” and after that click on “artillery” where is a list, photos and good info. — NOTE: 1] Romania did change sides on Wednesday, August 23rd 1944 and after that until the end of the war in Europe Romania did fight together with the Allies against Germany. 2] There was NO support [of any kind] received by the Romanian troops from the Red Army or Soviet Union while fighting the German Army. Liviu 03/19/07 P.S. The Romanian web-site mentioned above has good info about the Romanian Army during WW2. I wrote for them 3 articles in English about some small arms [30-ZB LMG, 9mm M1941 Orita SMG and VZ-24 bolt-action rifle], the first two articles still can be read at a certain address.

#10

The Romanian army operated under Soviet leadership and materiel control after changing sides in 1944 as did ALL standing armies in countries " LIBERATED" by the Soviet Union. They were assigned as front line troops in Poland and elsewhere when they suffered heavy loses against German and Hungarian units with which they had previously been allied. Romania continued to be dominated by the Soviet Union until its fall and the eventual summary execution of Romania’s leader and his wife.

Romanian ammunition other than small arms calibers is quite rare due to their lack of an extensive industry base and the predations of war.


#11
  • You started this topic asking info about an unknown gun [a “Romanian AT Gun” in your opinion] and according with what you posted above, the gun has been identified. If it isn’t “classified information”, you should let everyone know what type of gun is and a few details about it. Liviu 03/19/07

#12

Political correctness editing extinguishes my interest. I consider it un-American and offensive to free men everywhere.

I have nothing but sympathy for Romania being torn apart by totalitarian monsters on both sides .


#13
  • This topic has NO sense if you do refuse to post the info about the gun which “has been identified” [according with you, see your own lines posted earlier today March 19th]. Liviu 03/19/07

#14

When my post has been politically censored by the Forum Political Correctness Police ( FPP) I EXIT.

Your bit of pique precipitated the censorship of my information due to “possible misunderstanding” (SIC) per the FPP.

END OF MY INTEREST IN THE SUBJECT.