ADSID practice device


#1

I would like to share some info on the ADSID (Air Delivered Seismic Intrusion Detector).
In 1966 Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara issued guidance for the USA to dedign and build an electronic “wall” around South Vietnam to remotely track the movement of supplies. The code name was Igloo White and also called the McNamara Line. The program involved the implantation and monitoring of remote electronic sensors all along the Ho Chi Minh Trail to track vehicles and humane movement through acoustic and seismic signatures. The device was inserted by helicopter,transport plane and in high risk areas by fighter plane. Relay planes then flew over the sensors and then relayed the info back to the Infiltration Surveillance Center at Nakhon Phanom RTAFB.
The device was painted camo and from the tip the first 1/4" of the shaft was solid steel the rest of the shaft was hollow to let the device partially bury its self. The “case” was hollow to hold the electronics and the antenna. As you can see by the pics the device could be taken apart. The shaft unscrewed from the “caseneck” and the “caseneck” came apart by pushing in four tabs at the same time just above the fin slots. At a rather hard push of a button close to the base of the"case" and an upward pressure on the fins ,the fins partially folded upward.
The one I have is a practice device I think.

Are these collectable?
Any other info would be appreciate. Thanks frogbert.


#2

Thanks for the pictures and info, Frogbert. Very cool item and piece of history and science. I have seen the camouflaged ones on EBAY a few years ago. They were calling them, “JUNGLE DARTS”.

Jason


#3

frogbert, thanks a lot for showing this variation. If I got it right there were several models and some (or all?) had self destruct charges (or booby traps). The only real ones I have seen so far were in the museum of the armed forces of Laos in Vientiane.


#4

What I have been told is that there were different sizes, all of them smaller than the one I have. I am not sure but I think the one I have is the largest. Also I am not sure if the one I have is the right color for it has been repainted. Looking at the paint underneath the repaint I think that it is close.


#5

Those I had seen were all camauflaged and had even the antennas (protruding from the back) looking like a small tree with branches. The nature of this item demanded best possible disguise.


#6

I came across a doc describing this as project CHECO, IGLOO WHITE, MUSCLE SHOALS, PRACTICE NINE, DYE MARKER, DUMP TRUCK, MUD RIVER and ILLINOIS CITY. The project names changed several times (some were for sub-divisions) since the project was top secret and the names got compromised in public.
The project began on 16 Sept. 1966. There were two types of sensors used, seismic and accoustic and as said all sorts of booby traps have been developed for them.
All in all a unique project and part of a great story.

Here some of the sensors:

stinsonflyer.com/batcatsf/sensors.jpg

Electronics of the accoustic sensor:

stinsonflyer.com/batcatsf/serstadSensor.jpg


#7

Here some more info and images:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Igloo_White

Here one more great image:

i452.photobucket.com/albums/qq24 … /ADSID.jpg


#8

You always amaze me, Alex! Fantastic information all the way. That one pic showing them mounted under the aircraft was great.

Jason
PS: It would be cool to section one of these.


#9

frogbert, the one in your pictures looks like a late ADSID III (S) MA-37 short:

ACOUSID III section:

Here’s a picture of the ADSID I made by Sandia Corporation and illustrated in Project CHECO Report, Igloo White (Initial Phase), 31 july 1968:


#10

Thanks for the info guys it was really great
frogbert


#11

Fede- Where were the photos taken? Nice display!


#12

John, those are from the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. Follow this link for a 360º view tour (click on the map, click SEA War 056 and then turn the view to look on your back, then you can zoom in or click on the board):

nmusafvirtualtour.com/full/tour-pkg.html


#13

Super cool, Fede! Thank you.

Jason