AIR-2 Genie missile test "A wonderful thrill "

Two interesting youtube videos .

"Ding Dong " was the sound made by the electric door bells at that time .

genie_missile_test
http://youtu.be/1VZ7FQHTaR4

AIR-2 Genie AKA Ding Dong 
[url]http://youtu.be/2qM0mwL8q4c[/url]

This was a combination proof test of the Genie (AIR-2A) nuclear air-to-air rocket, and an effects test of the Genie W-25 warhead. The unguided Genie rocket was fired from a F-89J. The rocket travelled 4240 meters in 4.5 seconds (about Mach 3) after release before detonating. The predicted yield was 1.7 kt. The plutonium core W-25 (probably with a depleted uranium tamper) had a diameter of 17.35 inches, a length of 25.74 inches, and weighed 221 lb.

Memoirs of a 1950’s rocket science pioneer:

https://sites.google.com/site/playingwithfirememoirs/Playing-With-Fire/contents/missiles-1940-1960/usaf-genie

Stonewall, thank you for reminding us!

And some of us (me) never knew of it. But all the same, thanks for links.

Woah…what a shock wave in the first video…

Thank you for the awesome post and links! Awesome!

Jason

Interesting choice of chase aircraft (Martin B57) accompanying the F89 scorpion launch plane!
Thanks for the links

NATO Dave

Great pictures, but I have to question the author–the Genie was NEVER a “Missile” by AF definition, as it was unguided. As correctly stated in the caption (but in error in both the title to the post and in the linked article) the Genie was a nuclear capable ROCKET. It had no guidance system–a requirement to be correctly called a missile. The logic being that it would have been fired against a “wave” of Soviet bombers, and with the size of the warhead, there was no need to “guide” it to any particular target.

Taber

If I understand the American system correctly, the “R” in AIR indeed stands for rocket. Otherwise it would be AIM (as for the Sidewinder, for example).