AIR-2 Genie missile test "A wonderful thrill "


#1

Two interesting youtube videos .

"Ding Dong " was the sound made by the electric door bells at that time .

genie_missile_test
http://youtu.be/1VZ7FQHTaR4

AIR-2 Genie AKA Ding Dong 
[url]http://youtu.be/2qM0mwL8q4c[/url]

This was a combination proof test of the Genie (AIR-2A) nuclear air-to-air rocket, and an effects test of the Genie W-25 warhead. The unguided Genie rocket was fired from a F-89J. The rocket travelled 4240 meters in 4.5 seconds (about Mach 3) after release before detonating. The predicted yield was 1.7 kt. The plutonium core W-25 (probably with a depleted uranium tamper) had a diameter of 17.35 inches, a length of 25.74 inches, and weighed 221 lb.

Memoirs of a 1950’s rocket science pioneer:

https://sites.google.com/site/playingwithfirememoirs/Playing-With-Fire/contents/missiles-1940-1960/usaf-genie


#2

Stonewall, thank you for reminding us!


#3

And some of us (me) never knew of it. But all the same, thanks for links.


#4

Woah…what a shock wave in the first video…


#5

Thank you for the awesome post and links! Awesome!

Jason


#6

Interesting choice of chase aircraft (Martin B57) accompanying the F89 scorpion launch plane!
Thanks for the links

NATO Dave


#7

Great pictures, but I have to question the author–the Genie was NEVER a “Missile” by AF definition, as it was unguided. As correctly stated in the caption (but in error in both the title to the post and in the linked article) the Genie was a nuclear capable ROCKET. It had no guidance system–a requirement to be correctly called a missile. The logic being that it would have been fired against a “wave” of Soviet bombers, and with the size of the warhead, there was no need to “guide” it to any particular target.

Taber


#8

If I understand the American system correctly, the “R” in AIR indeed stands for rocket. Otherwise it would be AIM (as for the Sidewinder, for example).