Altered .30-03 paper bullet blank charger

I’d love to see a sectioned paper projectile. I understand there is a central cavity in it. Hope like heck that the charger is original.

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I was once told that some of the paper bullets were powder filled. Any truth to that?

Unfortunately, I recently damaged one of these rounds in a bunch of loose cartridges I was given by an old EOD buddy. The part of the bullet that is seated and crimped into the case mouth is pretty much solid, compacted paper. But the bullet itself, from about 1/8 inch from the case mouth to the tip, is only a couple layers of the brown thin cardboard, then filled with some small brown bits that reminded me of a case tumbler polishing media. Not a fine “power” and the same light brown color. Not heavy like something graphited, but light like corn cob or walnut shell. I should have saved the “sawdust” appearing stuff for analysis or sharing!
Taber

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Although originally made as .30-03 blanks, those shown in the photo have had the front of the case mouth slightly squeezed down so they will chamber better in M1903 rifles made in .30-06 caliber (or altered from .30-03 to .30-06). Apparently there were a lot of these converted.
HWS Volume 2 covers these.

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30-06 length. Remaining headstamp is F A but the date is missing.

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Thanks. Chris Punnett stated in his book that a small charge of EC powder was placed into the cavity of the bullet and sealed with shellac to aid in breakup of the bullet. Your photo does not show this, but I understand the basic structure.

Also picked up a charger filled with .30-03 paper blank cartridges last month. Dates are 5 05 and the rest 6-05’s. I wonder what that hole in the center inside was for. Tom

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Vlad’s clip with the very rounded ends is an early one. As to Tom’s query about the hole in the center (of the clip spring) I believe it served as a tooling index in early clips’ manufacture. Early Mauser clips have similar holes in the spring. Jack

p.s. if you will check Brian Green’s material on manufacture of 7x57 ammunition (and clips) in Spain in the 1890s you will see that the steel strips which were to become the spring portion of the clip had holes punched at an early stage in the manufacture. This seems to suggest the holes were intended to position the metal strips in the production tooling.

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