Ammo exhaust in old tanks


#1

Rheims, 1924. The field guns had gun powder smoke exiting into the inside of the tank every time it was unloaded. What did people do not to pass out from hours of smoke inhalation?


image


#2

I don’t think there was any sort of protection. Carbon Monoxide poisoning from the engine was common inside those things.


#3

Thats a British MK1 or MK2 tank.(mk2 I think) If you go to the British tank museum at Bovingdon they have one of those sectioned so you can see inside.
The engine in the middle of the tank is totally exposed with exposed valve gear etc. The inside of the tank would fill up with oil fumes from the hot engine.

All the drive shafts, differentials etc are also exposed inside so if you lost your balance and fell over you would get mashed to a pulp in the machinery. Rudimentary guards over them but not enough
The driver looked through a viewing slot on the front which the Germans soon learned to direct fire towards blinding or killing the driver.
The gun emplacements on the sides were also vunerable to small arms fire with gaps at the sides to allow the guns to traverse. and the entry/ exit doors were only flaps like ships doors which if they had concentrated machine gun fire directed at the join between the door and the body of the tank would allow bullet fragment to shower the crew inside.

The tank museum still has a couple of working models of these tanks and they get fired up and run out on open days.

Note the word VELOX on the photos. Kodak Velox paper was an early B&W photographic paper.


#4

Was the tank in the photo abandoned after the war or during a battle?


#5

I don’t know, it is from a 1924 travel photo album fotki.yandex.ru/users/sksvlad/al … slideshow/
but I assume it is a battle casualty, maybe the engine broke.


#6

The tank looks as though it has been stripped out. Certainly the guns have gone. Many did just break down and were abandoned. It was probably fitted with Toyota parts and the crew refused to drive it any further.

From its angle it looks like it got bogged down, many did.


#7

Vlad

I would guess that engine fumes were probably a greater risk than powder smoke. But, the guys inside those steel coffins had much more important things to worry about than a little carbon monoxide.

Ray


#8

[quote=“VinceGreen”]The tank looks as though it has been stripped out. Certainly the guns have gone. Many did just break down and were abandoned. It was probably fitted with Toyota parts and the crew refused to drive it any further.

From its angle it looks like it got bogged down, many did.[/quote]

Naa, they had Lucus electrics (Lucas, prince of darkness, inventor of black light and the reason that the British drink warm beer). They were lucky it got as far as it did (old JRT/BL mechanic and former Norton and Royal Enfield owner). :-)


#9

“Band of Brigands” gives a good account of conditions in the early tanks.


#10

[quote=“Tailgunner”][quote=“VinceGreen”]The tank looks as though it has been stripped out. Certainly the guns have gone. Many did just break down and were abandoned. It was probably fitted with Toyota parts and the crew refused to drive it any further.

From its angle it looks like it got bogged down, many did.[/quote]

Naa, they had Lucus electrics (Lucas, prince of darkness, inventor of black light and the reason that the British drink warm beer). They were lucky it got as far as it did (old JRT/BL mechanic and former Norton and Royal Enfield owner). :-)[/quote]

They probably did have Lucas electrics!