Ammo of the battleship USS North Carolina










If you want to see more of USS North Carolina, click here USS North Carolina, Wilmington, NC

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Dude, VERY cool!

I love the “From here the projectile can reach…” table.

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Vlad, so that shell on the 4 wheel dolly did you bring home when you left??? :upside_down_face:

Brian

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Yep, my daughter and her boyfriend helped me.

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The USS North Carolina is a fantastic ship and museum. Well maintained and as Vlad’s photos show, good attention to detail with the ammunition. I highly recommend visiting her.

IIRC, one of the 40mm clipping rooms was well done and full of 40mm goodies. Any pics of that Vlad?

I also remember being told by a member of the museum staff that the blue TP rounds for the main guns aren’t the correct ones for the period or the guns themselves. They were what was available from the Navy at the time the ship was sold to the state and were “close enough”. Can anyone confirm this?

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I have the bulk of photos here USS North Carolina, Wilmington, NC. I do not remember 40mm Bofors but there is a 20mm Oerlickon reloading room.

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I found a driving band photo of that “bullet” above.


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According to Wiki, the ship as built had quad 1.1 inch AA gun mountings rather than Bofors (may have been replaced, of course). They did have “clipping rooms” underneath each 1.1 inch mounting, where the rounds were inserted into frame-like clips and from where the clips were passed up to the loaders.

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I was still in the USN the first time I visited the NC in 1964, and I knew very well what a Bofors mount looked like. The North Carolina has 40 mm Bofors guns, not 1.1" quads.

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The info on the 1.10" quad mount AA indicates they were removed at Pearl Harbor in November, 1942.


Dave

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Sorry if this is off topic but my memory has been stimulated by this post
When I was younger I was told that for this big bores naval gun there were 3 different sizes in diameter for the grenades, depending on how hot was, and consequently enlarged, the barrel after some fired rounds. I suppose we’re speacking around of decimals of cm, but I have no more info about that. Is this true?

What are the three twin barrel gun platforms [turrets? proper name?] I see in the background, IMG_2970?
Thanks!

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I think they are 5 inch guns 5-inch/38-caliber gun - Wikipedia

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I am afraid that is a cock and bull story. While hot barrels expand, it is in no way on the same order of magnitude as depth of grooves.
With separate loading ammunition, the only felt difference would be the ability to ram the projectile a little deeper into the chamber, until the driving band contacts the start of the rifling.

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Wasn’t there a large piece of German artillery that had sequential sized projectiles to allow for barrel wear?

The Paris gun had compensation for the chamber volume growing due to erosion (the driving band engagement with the rifling occuring farther forward). But there were no “increasing diameter” projectiles.
See BULL/MURPHY: Paris Kanonen - the Paris Guns, 1988
Author Murphy is the well known personality from ARL, Aberdeen. Author Gerald V. Bull met his fate in 1990 at the hands of a killer, using a .22 cal. pistol, possibly due to his connections to Saddam Hussein of Iraq.

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little of-topic ,i heard that bull was killed by 7.65 bullets not 22

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Might you be thinking of a “aqueeze bore” canon? That is what popped into my mind…

Thanks for the explanation and clarification!

From the Washington Post:
“Gerald V. Bull was killed outside his sixth-floor apartment in a fashionable Brussels suburb on March 22, 1990, by two assassins who pumped five 7.65mm bullets from a silenced gun into his neck and back and then escaped .”

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