An odd ball 30-06


#1

I recently picked up this 30-06 and don’t know what it is.

It is all tinned, including projectile and primer. Standard black tip for AP. Red Primer annulus. Magnetic projectile. Total weight = 413.6 gr.

Any ideas what it is?

Thanks,
Dave


#2

Dave - Interesting cartridge. Maybe Rene will have an answer.

Tinned cases are not unusual but it’s odd to find an AP bullet tinned also. Did you give the bullet a magnet test to be sure it’s an AP ? (Not magnetic at the tip but magnetic as you go down the ogive).

I have a bunch of Denver 43 AP cartridges and the total weight is the same. Same red primer seal with a generous dollop of paint.

Ray

Added - I do have a stannic-stained cartridge and M2 bullet with an FA 39 headstamp. It’s for extraction tests as described in HWS 1, page 133. Maybe yours is for the same purpose?


#3

Hey Ray,

Thanks. Yes, the projectile is magnetic.

I agree that tinned or stanic stained cases are common, but not in 1943.

You are onto something with that FA39. I did not look on volume I due to the later date on my round.

Dave


#4

Dave
is the case magnetic?


#5

Dave

Stannic cases do exist all through WW 2 in the HPT cartridges. I was thinking that might be what it was but the AP bullet doesn’t fit. Of course, the Teflon coated cartridges used AP so anything is possible.

Ray


#6

Hey Ray,

No, it is brass.

Thanks,
Dave


#7

The silvery tint does not look uniform.
Perhaps this is the result of being exposed to chemical fumes (mercury?) at some point since it was manufactured, and is not factory made in its present appearance.


#8

sorry for late reply, but I am currently travelling with no access to any documentation

Strange cartridge, not only for the “tinning” but also because of the magnetic jacket.
I have quite a few AP’s but all have GM jackets and not a single one has a GMCS jacket.
My first thought was a HPT cartridge with AP bullet but I have no documentation to prove that.
I’ll go through my files when I am back next week, maybe I’ll find something.

cheers
René


#9

Dave

It’s still not clear to me. Is the bullet magnetic only on the ogive, or on the tip as well? An AP from that period would only be magnetic on the ogive.

Ray


#10

I agree with René – I have no record of US AP M2 rounds with a GMCS jacket from the WW2 period. The earliest recorded headstamps I have where the AP bullet with black tip had a GMCS jacket are FA 51 and TW 5 and TW 53.

The FA rounds had a crimped nickel No. 31 primer and the TW rounds had a normal brass primer.


#11

Dave, does the bullet rattle when shaken?


#12

dak21

A FAIRLY LARGE QUANTITY OF DENVER ORDNANCE PLANT AMMUNITION ENDED UP IN INDIA IN THE EARLY 50’S. PERHAPS THIS CARTRIDGE IS A POST WAR PRODUCT OF INDIA. I CAN ONLY CONFIRM THAT THEY LOADED SOME DEN 43 CASES WITH WOOD BULLET PROJECTILES IN THE 50’S. HAVE YOU WEIGHED THE CARTRIDGE IN AN ATTEMPT TO CONFIRM IT CONTAINS POWDER?


#13

Ray, the projo is only magnetic on the ogive.

Fede, it does not rattle.

There is no doubt this is a finish deliberately applied to the surfaces, and not random corrosion. The non-uniform appearance is just from poor storage over time. It was applied before the tip color, and the primer annulus. I am not a fan of aggressive cleaning, but I picked a tiny spot, and I can clean the black-ish stuff off, and the silvery, tinned like finish is under it.

I really appreciate everyone’s questions and thoughts.

Thanks,
Dave