Another strange .303 round found


#1

I posted in other topics .303 Britt rounds that I have found in a large batch of 'Battlefield Pick-up" ammunition I bought several years back. I was told by Navy Arms that this ammunition was used in one of the wars between India and Pakistan.
I have no reason to doubt what I was told as many rounds are from those two countries as well as everyone else who made .303 ammo. I have found ammo from WWI up to the late 60’s.
Today I was culling the lot and found another round that had been field modified,for what reason I haven’t a clue.
The bullet was tightly crimped into place. The projectile had had a brass ring placed into the core of the bullet with great care.
Two Excelsior wads were placed over a light charge of what looks to be a shotgun powder. It is very light and the color is on the green side of gray. It is not Hotchkiss Glass Plate Flake,so commonly used overseas. The Berdan Primer has been dug out with a knife and a shotgun primer has been inserted tightly into the base of the cartridge.
Perhaps a wire was to be attached to the ring in the bullet to pull something out when fired? Seems someone went to a lot of work to make this cartridge for a special job. If it could only talk?


#2

It doesn’t make sense as I don’t know how it could be used this way, but maybe line throwing or something to do with radio antenna erection? Possibly a coil of fine wire was in the case behind the bullet and tied to the loop.


#3

Wouldn’t the line still be in the case? Perhaps it has something to do with home-made construction of the bullet itself?


#4

What if? The bullet was stored in the normal fashion and then put into the case backwards when needed?


#5

Perhaps the hook is from a lead fishing sinker and somehow some of the lead sinker was used to fill the jacket? Just thinking out loud. This is indeed a strange one!

AKMS


#6

Maybe this loop can produce a whistling sound when flying?


#7

That is another good idea.


#8

Probably just more of that top quality reloaded ammo from that famous border town in Pakistan, where the makers use everything but the kitchen sink. BUT the stuff works!


#9

Absolutely, Khyber Pass / Darrah ammo cannot hit the proverbial barn door but it goes bang! A Canadian ammo researcher tested Darrah No 1 Enfields years ago and found them cracking at about 100 shots. Falling apart, i.e. exploding, at 120 shots iirc.
Soren


#10

Very hard to place the powder but it bears a good resemblance to the Soviet shot gun powders used in Baikal cartridges. They were very popular over here years ago because they were so cheap.
That would fit with Pakistan in a round about sort if way
I’m not entirely sure that is a .303 bullet either.


#11

The only bullet I have lying around with a brass loop screwed into the lead is one I use as a Plumb Bob on a length of thread when wallpapering. I fitted the screw eye myself and cannot see how such a bullet could find a way into a live round!

gravelbelly


#12

[quote=“VinceGreen”]Very hard to place the powder but it bears a good resemblance to the Soviet shot gun powders used in Baikal cartridges. They were very popular over here years ago because they were so cheap.
That would fit with Pakistan in a round about sort if way
I’m not entirely sure that is a .303 bullet either.[/quote]

Agreed Vince. I am fairly certain that the bullet is from a 7.62x54R round.

Perhaps this was a sophisticated Khyber Pass reloader and the loop was added to increase the weight to that of the .303 ball bullet!
As both the .303 case and the bullet (being CN or CNCS) are pre WW2 I wonder when this was actually put together.

Regards
TonyE


#13

Anyone notice the carved out case bottom and the shotgun shell primer?
Gregg


#14

#15

[quote=“TonyE”][

Agreed Vince. I am fairly certain that the bullet is from a 7.62x54R round.

[/quote]

That would be a pre 1930’s Russian production then. How likely would that be?


#16

I found quite a few of these .303 cartridges some years back while going through the floor sweepings from the Turkish 8mm imports. All that I found were primed with shot shell primers as well. The projectiles varied from reclaimed fired projectiles, mostly .30 M2 ball & AP, to hammered down 8mm bullets. The projectile in the picture looks very much like a “resized” 8mm S bullet. The hook or pin in the base was probably inserted to allow the projectile to be rotated as it was pounded into the correct diameter.All of the cartridges were delivered to Bill Woodin to add to the collection. JH


#17

I am certainly the least qualified here to speculate on the origins of this round and it’s components. However, I have seen 2 similar bullets. My father has 2 souvenir bullets that were taken out of his aircraft from ground fire during WW2 and one of the aircraft maintenance crew soldered a ring (looks like a cotter pin) in the base of the bullets similar to this. They were hung on their dog tags like a piece of jewelery. He said this was not uncommon in his squadron. Is it possible it was a similar type souvenir bullet put back into service? Although there appears to be no rifling marks on this projectile. If I can get him to locate them I will photograph.


#18

[quote=“EOD”][quote=“TonyE”][

Agreed Vince. I am fairly certain that the bullet is from a 7.62x54R round.

[/quote]

That would be a pre 1930’s Russian production then. How likely would that be?[/quote]

Since the .303 case is 1935 why would an early bullet be so strange?

Regards
TonyE


#19

Almost anything is possible given the area


#20

I just measured the bullet. It is a hammered down .323 bullet. It measures from .323 down to .319 at the waist. 150 grain.