Anyone got this book Ammunition: A Descriptive Treatise


#1

Ammunition: A Descriptive Treatise on the Different Projectiles, Charges, Fuzes, Rockets, &c., at Present in Use for Land and Sea Service, and on Other War Stores Manufactured in the Royal Laboratory by Vivian Dering Majendie

I’ve seen this for sale on Amazon UK and wondered if this was worth buying as a general book connected with ammunition etc.


#2

I should think it would be, although I have not seen, nor have it.
V.D. Majendie was ca. 1870 a Captian, and Assistant Superintendant at R.L. I’m not sure when he passed, but if your interested in early British stuff… this would be from the “horse’s mouth”


#3

I would second Pete here - Majendie is a very important source of reference.


#4

Cheers, Gents.

I’ve ordered a copy from amazon at


#5

I do own it and it is a waste of money for other than general reference.

You will most likely never own anything which is shown.

This version is a poor reprint of the original which is a rare book.

Much better references available.

These early references are interesting but fairly useless for collectors unless one collects books which I do as well but this one is a waste.

Try to find it in the library and save the money for specimens for your collection.


#6

[quote=“CSAEOD”]I do own it and it is a waste of money for other than general reference.

So it’s OK as a general reference and not a waste

You will most likely never own anything which is shown.

how do you know ?

This version is a poor reprint of the original which is a rare book.

better a reprint than no book at all

Much better references available.

you mean other references are available, some of which are better

These early references are interesting but fairly useless for collectors unless one collects books which I do as well but this one is a waste.

I’ll make up my own mind as to whether this book is a waste

Try to find it in the library and save the money for specimens for your collection.

tried that first

[/quote]


#7

Good that you have the ability to make up your mind. Lots of folks who have not seen the book have opinions about it, You might benefit from the information from someone who has actually seen ( and owns ) both the original and the reprint in question.

I prefer opinions from folks with experience rather than conjecture.

Check back once you obtain ANY ammunition item mentioned in the text. I will be happy to applaud you.

Standing by.

Good Hunting !


#8

Where is it written that to be interesting and informative, a book must be about ammunition that you can find for a collection. I thought a collection was something that led to a study, and that the purpose of a study was to gain knowledge about an area of interest, not just about cartridges you hoped to find someday. I read about auto pistol cartridges all the time that I have no hope of ever obtaining, and it adds to my base of knowledge on my subject of interest. In my entire library - not the best in the world but not so bad - I have only one or two books that I have found to be completely useless. That’s out of 1500 or so. Not a bad average. If I could afford it, that number would be doubled easily, I am sure. Unfortunately, since older literature is no longer for reading but rather for collecting and price speculation, I can’t even afford to add to my catalog file, so books are still the most attractive source of information for me, other than the net.

My own criteria for obtaining a book does not include the necessity that I be able to obtain items shown in it.


#9

This thread was about : Anyone got this book ? Thus far lots of rhetoric and opinions from folks who don’t .

I do have it and you see my opinion.

What is the value of the opinions of those who don’t?

Just plain rhetoric.

Find a copy of the book and opine from knowledge.

Over 50 years of dealing with COLLECTORS has taught me that they are very reluctant to spend money on reference materials. Ask George Hoyem , Dean Thomas and others who do first class work and have to work even harder to sell the books. The question here; was the book worth buying?.

Interesting to see comments from the folks who don’t have one or who don’t even express than they have read it BUT do have an opinion.

Rumination about the value of historical literature is certainly a possible sideline of interest. How does it address the subject of the thread?

Do you have a copy John ?

Tell us about it.

What is your opinion about THE BOOK ?


#10

No, I don’t have a copy of the book. I will add it to my want list though. I am not a wealthy man, and buy books as I can afford them. Your comment about people not buying literature is true, but does not apply to me. I have well over a thousand books on firearms, probably an equal number on other subjects, and 60 + file drawers full of catalogs, manuals, articles, drawings, etc. on firearms and ammunition.

None of my comments are made the least bit invalid by my not having this book. If you can tell me, since you have both copies, that there is absolutely nothing of value in the book for a serious student of ammunition I might - only might - consider removing it from my want list.

Your comments to Armourer seem to have centered on judging the value of the book by the numbers of specimens described therein that one might acquire. A second and third reading of your comments has not changed that impression. That is the point I was making, that the book should be judged for its scholastic value and not based on “can I get that stuff.”

People on this Forum whom I respect have indicated that it has good scholastic value.

I have explained how I feel, as have you. I think it is sufficient.


#11

Got it. Nothing I say refers to you unless it has your name on it. Collectors want to collect stuff not books unless they collect books (which I do as well). I have always tried to provide information for COLLECTORS who actually can COLLECT items which they find along life’s way.

Practical books for COLLECTORS have items in them which can likely or even possibly be found and collected.

Great scholarly books and there are some to mention which don’t show items which someone might actually find are interesting but of USE to collectors. Doubtfull.

There is a fellow in Europe who I am sure you are aware of who has written super books on ammunition with lots of great photos and information BUT the books are expensive and 95% of the items will NEVER be available to the average collector.

That is who i am; THE AVERAGE COLLECTOR. I want to go to a gun show , cartridge show , flea market , yard sale antique shop and find something.

I want books which teach me about what I am likely to be able to collect.

That’s the point. Tomes of antiquity or contemporary expostulation showing items unlikely to be excountered to COLLECT are of little USE to collectors.

I can see all manner of rare items here in the Smithsonian museums. Few of which can be COLLECTED.

This is one of the reasons why my ammunition display in the Smithsonian has ammunition which people can actually find. It is very popular according to the current and past staff and it is because of these type of comments which I have heard many times while there: " Look son, I have one of those", “that’s the kind of shell your grandfather taught me to shoot with” , " I have seen those at gun shows" ; along that vane.

I have 16th,17th and 18th century manuscripts and publication about the subject of guns and ammunition which are USELESS to cartridge collectors.

Rare , valuable , yes and TOTALLY USELESS to cartridge collectors.

When I take the time to write it is with the goal of promoting COLLECTING AMMUNITION -

I HAVE A LOT OF THIS STUFF TO GET RID OF !

Here is my simple minded philosophy; COLLECTING GOOD - NOT COLLECTING BAD.


#12

Collector because he wants to accumulate stuff that’s pretty and that he likes - Good.

Collector because he wants to really learn about a specific field while enjoying the hardware - Good.

Collector who is a general collector because he wants to learn and have stuff from a lot of different fields - Good.

Collector who is a serious student of ammunition and wants to learn all he is able to in the time he has, whether he will ever get to even see the items - Good.

Student who loves to read about historical things and doesn’t collect a single one of them - Good.

We all collect or study historical and non-so-historical for different motives.
All are good. I don’t care if a guy has cartridges because they look nice in a drawer. If it brings him pleasure it is Good.

There are very few motives for collecting anything that are not so good.


#13

BINGO

Does anyone else WHO ACTUALLY HAS THE BOOK or HAS READ IT have an opinion ?


#14

[quote=“CSAEOD”]BINGO

Does anyone else WHO ACTUALLY HAS THE BOOK or HAS READ IT have an opinion ?[/quote]
What more can one add to the debate already played out here. I have skimmed through a copy, as a reprint for less than 20$s I don’t see how you can go wrong, assuming the quality is any good. Originals, when available, are demanding a price I would never pay. Even the later Textbook on Ammunition versions are of little general use for me, as its not my field of interest, but that said, I am looking at row upon row of cartridge books I already don’t use. For a general collector, 20$s doesn’t seem a bad investment for an interesting read.


#15

Not worth more than a SKIM ?
Right on.

Good to hear an opinion for someone else who has

actually seen it.