Artillery Eye Candy


#1

I just restored my 5"/54 Projectile. I know that it’s not 100% accurate, so no nit-picking, please.

Ray


#2

Cool, what fired these?


#3

MK 16 Gun, 5"/54 MK 39 Mount.


#4

Nice Job Ray!

Found a pallet of these recently, no fuzes and pretty rough. Couldn’t talk one into my hot little fingers though.


#5

Ray,
I don’t see any nits there to pick…very nice!

Dave


#6

Hi, Ray…REAL NICE…No “No Shave” chits on this one…Alot cleaner than an engine room…Randy


#7

Nice one Ray. Is it as heavy as you remembered them to be?


#8

Rick

It’s a lot heavier, for some reason. In fact, I dropped it when I was putting it up on the table to photograph. Luckily, a carpeted floor.

I remember one time a sailor dropped one when we were bringing some up from the magazine. All the hatches were open and it went clink, clank, boing, bang as it went down all 4 decks. I looked around and everybody had skeedaddled. I told them there was no use in running. Shrapnel travelled faster than they ever could.

Ray


#9

Just curious, but is this a one off sample, for old times sake, or are you going off the deep end and moving onto the big stuff? Trust me on this , it’s addictive. I got the feevah!


#10

Rick

I’m not into collecting the big stuff. This is a projectile that I used when I was a 5" GM, so it’s more of a nostalgia thing. I have a 5" brass case, a complete 3"/50, a 40mm, a 20mm, all that I have restored. I also have a few others such as a 3"/23, and a 1 Pdr Heavy.

I have been corresponding with another collector who was into the big stuff and he just recently sold the collection. He had more than 80 specemins. So it can really get out of hand. I have no desire to go there.

Ray


#11

"I have no desire to go there."
That’s what they all say, Ray. That’s what they’ve all SAID.


#12

So this rounds proper name is 5"/30-06 Meketa Wildcat :)


#13

Awesome job Ray! Well done!

Jason
PS: Large Bore Rules! :-)


#14

Ray, Very, very nice work! Don’t forget to bring it if you ever visit Holland :-)
I have added some fuze info (hnsa.org)


#15

Western

The MK 59 fuze on that MK 41 projectile is a huge one. Almost 10" long and weighs over 4 pounds. It was designed especially for the MK 16 guns when the Midway Class carriers were planned.

Ray


#16

This’n might fit it:


#17

Rick

I’m not sure what the MK 90 was for. I’d have to look it up.

Here’s a MK 59 along side an older MK 58. The MK 58 was used on the 3"/50 RF guns. The MK 41 projectile had to be specially cavitized to accept the MK 59.

Ray


#18

Having posted a sampling of fuzes I’d acquired on BOCN, with the question: Whadda these fit?: I got the following info on the MK90.

MK90:
Used in 5in/38 US Navy Gun, MK12
Used on projectiles: HE; MK 35,47,49,51, or 119.
This was a proximity fuze that used IR as the active signal. Its primary use was against airborn targets.
While it has been replaced by a similar fuze, MK404, as of 1999 the Mod 1 was still considered to be in the active inventory.

That is everything I know about it. Sadly, it’s missing all the innerds.


#19

The 5"/38 MK 12 was the old WWII era gun. It was fitted with VT fuzes right about the war’s end but I don’t find the MK 90 among the ones listed. So it must be a later thing. It could also be a rocket fuze or maybe not even U.S. I think the Brits had VT fuzes that looked like that too.

And, I don’t recall VT fuzes being used with HE projectiles. They were commonly used on HC or AA. In fact, I don’t recall any 5" HE projectiles.

Of course, what do I know.

Can you measure the thread diameter? that could tell us something.

Ray


#20

67MM . approx. 3mm deep.

The gain(e) is, I believe, dated 1970.