? artillery primer?


#1

ID help ?..my guess…artillery primer ??

(any better info ?)(PS…not mine…helping a friend)

Pepper


#2

Yes a cannon primer.


#3

Yes Pepper artillery primer

best regards
gyrojet


#4

I will make it unanimous. It’s an artillery OR cannon primer. Of course, I really don’t know, but I trust the other two guys.

I’d also guess that, what looks like a small primer is actually a firing pin that, in turn, ignites an internal percussion primer and the main powder charge.

Ray


#5

I have seen a few primers where what looks like the cap is actually a striker. I would think this is so there is less chance of the blast forcing the cap out.


#6

If I was a nit picker I would say that little piece is technically called the Firing Plug. But I’m not. ;)

Ray


#7

That’s a good piece of nit picking to know. Thanks


#8

One for Tony Williams perhaps


#9

Isn’t the internet wonderful? I decided to google “vent tube primer” and found myself at www.thepirateking.com (which proved to be a fascinating site, compulsory reading for any aspiring Captain Jack Sparrow). However it did give me a glimpse into the world of medieval weaponry and includes a simple child’s guide to the development of the cannon and early artillery


#10

John,

The name “Vent Tube Primer” is also applied to Naval guns. All of the BL (Breech Loading) screw breech guns were popped off by VTP’s, some as large as 1 inch calibre. During my time afloat we still used .5" VTP’s in a short adapted cartridge case to test firing circuits on 4.5" QF (Quick Firing) guns.

These tubes packed quite a wallop. If you are in a hurry and forget to remove the tampions and muzzle covers then the heavy tampions rip their way through the covers and produce a neat group more than 100 yards away in the sea. This scientific “trial” was carried out from two twin gun turrets, at 5 degrees elevation from X- Battery of HMS Eagle in about 1965.

gravelbelly


#11

Dave


#12

gravelbelly

On mounts where it was difficult to access the muzzle, the short case and primer could be fired to blow the tampon and cover off. But only in an emergency. Woe betide any Gunners Mate who did such a thing accidently. It was something that he was never allowed to forget. :)

JJE, the largest US Naval gun to use a brass case was an 8 inch.

Ray


#13

[quote=“Ray Meketa”]gravelbelly

On mounts where it was difficult to access the muzzle, the short case and primer could be fired to blow the tampon and cover off. But only in an emergency. Woe betide any Gunners Mate who did such a thing accidently. It was something that he was never allowed to forget. :)

JJE, the largest US Naval gun to use a brass case was an 8 inch.

Ray[/quote]

Ray,

Woe betide any Ordnance Tiffy who did it too! It was a difficuly episode to wriggle out of.

JJE, The largest UK Royal Naval cartridge case that I can think of was for the twin 6 inch automatic guns as fitted on the Tiger class cruisers. These incredibly complex feed systems were full of traps to catch the OA’s out. One gun fired a drill shell (120 pounds) in front of a full cordite charge inside Devonport dockyard. A fair bit of damage to dockyard stuff but thankfully no injuries. The big bang was five minutes before a shift change. At shift change, with the roadway crowded with workers the slaughter would have been terrible. Fortunately the OA, who was subsequently Court Martialled, was not me.

gravelbelly


#14

gravelbelly

Another great sea-story.

The list of rules for Gunners Mates is a long one and Number One is, "NEVER shoot your own ship!" I suppose that would apply to a dock also. ;)

Ray


#15

Dave and Ray


#16

Those big guns were marvels of post war technology, firing big shells at 20 rounds per minute per gun. However, the ammunition supply and feed to the guns was complex. It relied on those “modern” marvels micro-switches, hundreds of them, to synchronise the hoists and rammers. One of these switches would fail every so often resulting in a jam in the system and some mangled machinery to repair.

Shells were stored deep in the ship in shell rooms, cordite charges also deep in magazines. All ammunition had to come all the way up, you couldn’t introduce rounds at any intermediate level. This meant that all drill shell and cartridge also had to be introduced at the bottom. So we had to break the golden rule of never storing live and drill ammo together. There were “lanes” of cordite and shell which the magazine OA could select from a control panel. Most lanes contained warshot ammo, a few contained drill ammo.

The ammo was never handled by men once its journey to the sky commenced. A wrong lane was selected during gun drill and a live cordite charge entered the system and was rammed behind a drill shell. The drill shells had no driving band and were undersized in diameter. The drill shell was supposed to zip through the greased barrel into catcher chutes and rails on the upper deck. The gun fired with the barrels in depression, the loose drill shell “porpoised” its way down the bore, flattening out rifling lands, helped by the rush of hot gases squeezing past it. It carried away the catcher rails and penetrated the granite dock wall, flipping a six foot cube of stone skywards, and came up through the roadway. It then passed through the cabin of a crane and continued up. The crane driver moved very fast down the ladder.

I had better shut up now, too much gun talk.

gravelbelly


#17

delete