Assorted Japanese cartridges


#1

From the left, I have these identified as:
25 x 163 Japanese Navy Type 96 AA
20 x 142 Type 98 AA
20 x 125 AP Type 97
20 x 101 RB Japanese Navy Type 99-2
20 x 94 HO-5
20 x 72 RB Japanese Navy Type 99-1
13.2 x 99 Japanese Navy Type 3 and 93
12.7 x 81 SR HE Type 1 (HO-103) Aircraft guns

Any (or all) needing correction? If any need correcting, perhaps I can count on Pepper and his bottle for some assistance.


#2

Nice collection Guy!!

Steve


#3

They look OK as far as I can judge.

I believe that your 20x94 has the Ma 202 fuzeless HE projectile.


#4

Thanks Tony and Steve.

Tony.
These cartridges all have a couple of holes in the cases, and powder removed. I am having a time with corrosion on quite a few that starts around the one or both case holes and spreads out from there. What might be causing this. Obviously, its not the powder. Perhaps the HE? Any suggestions to stop it? These came to me as part of a collection. Whats the best way to ensure the projectiles have been made safe. I assume with the inerting of the cases, that this was also done, but not knowing, I tend to handle these very carefully.


#5

Sorry, Guy, I can’t help you there. Lots of my cases have holes in but I’ve never seen any corrosion around them. Also, I don’t know how you can tell for certain (other than by dismantling them - a potentially very risky business) whether or not an unfired HE/I projectile still contains some active ingredients.


#6

At one point in my Navy life I was an Inert Ordnance Certification Officer. That means it was my job to determine and document if ordnance training devices were truly inert. We were trained by EOD personnel but perhaps the 1st thing we learned is that there was no standards, up to that point, for safeing ordnance. In the case of rounds like you have, Guy, we would shake them and listen for something like powder slopping around. For the HE heads, we would look for obvious signs of deactivation, such as holes or hollow basis. A blue ban on the warhead indicated an inert training rd too. But in most cases we did not have live rds that had been deactivated. It was considered to dangerous. Our training ordnance was usually made that way, from the factory or depot

If the projectiles appear to never having been removed and you cannot see the base, or obvious external signs of deactivation, I would certainly consider these to be live

As for the corrosion, I would suspect there is enough residue inside that has reacted with either moisture or air and produces a corrosive gas that is attacking the case. We had this happen to some pyrotechnic cartridges for the AN/M8 pistol that had been deactivated from live rds and someone from NAD Crane told us to spray WD40 into the holes. However, it either did not work or the damage had gone to far. They were eventually replaced with new inert rds from Crane. These cases were aluminum, not brass or steel.

Don’t know whether this helps or not but just trying to pass on some stuff your tax dollars spent for me to learn!


#7

[quote=“Guy Hildebrand”]Thanks Tony and Steve.

Tony.
These cartridges all have a couple of holes in the cases, and powder removed. I am having a time with corrosion on quite a few that starts around the one or both case holes and spreads out from there. What might be causing this. Obviously, its not the powder. Perhaps the HE? Any suggestions to stop it? These came to me as part of a collection. Whats the best way to ensure the projectiles have been made safe. I assume with the inerting of the cases, that this was also done, but not knowing, I tend to handle these very carefully.[/quote]

Guy, if the holes in the cases have the corrosion around it comes mostly from popping the primers after the powder was dumped. The primers are mostly corrosive and when popped corrosion causing residue is blown out of the drilled hole and “grows out” from the inside of the case. Most people forget (or dont care) that the projectile base exposed to the priming composition residue starts to rust inside the case.
Same goes for cases where the hole was drilled below the case shoulder and the tracer compound got burned out, the corrosion effect may be the same.
So if someone has drilled cases with popped primers it might be recommendable to put some sticky acid free oil (not those spray can types) inside the case and make sure it covers the projectile’s base.