Ballistic (pipe) flare(ing) cartridges


#1

A good friend gave me a box of 25 PARKER Ballistic flares. These are a good fit in 44 S&W, and a bit shorter than 44 Sp.
They appear to be in very good condition, and are in the original box…also in good condition.

He would like to know if they’re collectable or if he should just save them for Halloween. :) Of course, being a slave to the dollar he would also like to know the value if any.

Thanks for looking,
Rob


#2

Those are cartridges made for a tool gun. Such as driving a nail, or stud into a piece of steel, wood or such. I would not use them in a conventional weapon, as it could be dangerous.


#3

Thanks very much Pete deCoux,
So much for the Halloween display! The label word “flare” is misleading isn’t it?
One thing for sure: I will not be risking my S&W 629 Lew Horton Special with these.
Again, thank you,
R


#4

The use of the term “Flare” on this box does not mean a flare to shoot into the air to produce light. It is actually refering to the use of the cartridges in a special tool to form a flared end on a pipe to make a flare type joint.


#5

Thanks for the info Ron M.
Should these be stored indefinetly in case someone wants them or just disposed of?


#6

Do my old eyes deceive me or does the box actually say “BALLISTIC FLARER”?

Ray


#7

Your “old” eyes are better than mine! You are correct. The word is “flarer”.
Does this further confuse the issue?
Rob


#8

I do not think the word being “Flarer” rather than"Flare" muddies the waters at all. It actually rather confirms what Ron Merchant said about them!


#9

“I do not think the word being “Flarer” rather than"Flare” muddies the waters at all. It actually rather confirms what Ron Merchant said about them!"

True enough! I’m easily confused though. :)
I have another question: Can these be sent to the US as “dangerous goods”, or are there import restrictions on them?
I’m sure USPS is a no go, but we have a local UPS agent.
Thanks for looking,
Rob


#10

[quote=“rodagra”]I have another question: Can these be sent to the US as “dangerous goods”, or are there import restrictions on them?
I’m sure USPS is a no go, but we have a local UPS agent.
Thanks for looking,
Rob[/quote]

Rob

A good question. Let us know what you find out. And while you’re at it find out if empty or inert cases are considered “munitions” under the recently adopted Canada Post regulations.

Ray


#11

Ray,
Cartridge brass, unprimed/unloaded is ok to go Canada Post. I’ll check with UPS in a day or two and get back with the info.
Rob


#12

Rob

Did you get the opinion from someone in authority? In writing? Last December I was trying to send some empty brass to a shooting friend in Saskatoon and neither of us could get an answer, one way or the other. The new regulations went into effect, in October 2006 I believe, but apparantly there were no “defintions” that accompanied them. Rather than risk it he decided to have another shooter smuggle the cases across the line. Breaking one law to get around another, so to speak.

Ray


#13

Ray,
I think your problem was with new US export regulations, not Canada Post.
We can no longer get brass directly from most US distributors. It is still available but they will only ship to Canadian firms with all the permits in place. We have the same problem with scopes—even rings and bases—and many other gun parts from the US. Some US retailers like Midway and Mid-South just don’t bother with our small market and all the paperwork involved.
Others, such as Brownells have all the export permits in place at their end and the experience to get things done.
We do send brass back and forth via Canada Post all the time, and the only restriction for domestic shipments is that it must be empty brass.
Rob


#14

Rob

I don’t mean to belabor this but I don’t think the problem, at least until recently, was/is a problem on this side of the line. Canada Post changed it’s regulation to deny the shipment of inert munitions, supposedly in response to a concern over national security. When asked what was meant by “munitions”, no one would give an answer. To you and me it means things such as bombs, grenades, mortars, etc. but without a clear definition it could mean anything that a customs agent says it is.

I am not talking about the import of commercial quantities of brass or parts which require permits but the trading of an empty case or two by shooters or collectors.

Anytime I contact an official to get an answer and they tell me they do not know, it sends up a red flag. That is exactly what has happened. I dropped the issue the first of the year and maybe things have become clearer since then. That’s why I was asking you what you had learned.

Ray


#15

Hmmm,
Here’s what I know; As stated, I can ship anything relating to commercial brass WITHIN Canada at any time. I cannot ship loaded ammunition, or something like these flarer cartridges to the US without spending days or weeks getting the paperwork in order. Similarly, US shippers must have an export permit to ship to Canada and the Canadian recipient needs a matching import permit.
Apparently some individuals and very small businesses will ship brass north using USPS, but at risk of losing the shipment…and a lot more. :(
We have a local collector who is travelling to the IAA show in April. I just got off the phone to him and he said he’d take anything down when he goes, but there wouldn’t be time to get the paperwork in order between now and then.
Sad isn’t it?
Rob