Barnaul .30-06?


#1

Does anyone know the purpose of the annular groove around the head of the lacquered steel cased .30-06 cartridges currently being made by Barnual in Russia? I picked up a few empties at the range today. Most have the groove intact, but one has the groove “blown-out” or fire-formed to look like a normal '06 case. It can’t be due to the lacquered case? The French and probably others have fielded this case type without the groove. Any ideas?

AKMS


#2

I was never able to determine the purpose of this groove with any accuracy. It appears on the lacquered steel and chrome-plated steel but not (to my knowledge) on their brass-cased 30-06. Some lacquered steel cases were made without the groove. When questioned at a trade show in Europe, the staff from Barnaul reportedly stated that it was to aid extraction, BUT staff at trade shows from the Eastern Bloc (in the 90s) were poorly trained and often had never even visited the manufacturing facility so I am not convinced they were speaking with any credibility.

The earliest Barnaul .30-06 production doesn’t seemed to have used the groove. I had one headstamped 17 … 90 (Factory 17, 1990 with the 3 dots indicating 3 “lines” or .30 Cal) with a lacquered steel case without the groove.

I agree that the French and the US managed to use .30-06 steel cases without the groove but it might be that Barnaul is using a different type of steel that necessitates the groove.

Sorry I can’t help - I hope someone has been able to talk to the developers at Barnaul and can now relate the real reason for the groove.


#3

Still curious why only one of the seven fired cases I found had the groove blown out and the rest still had the groove intact. Could the powder charge have been that much lighter? Several of my rifle team mates tried this ammunition in their M-1 rifles and found it to be very “hot” and saw large muzzle flashes when fired. Others have suggested that the powder used is of the wrong type or burn rate to be used in the M-1. Has this groove been seen on any other caliber by any other maker ever?

AKMS


#4

You do have to be careful in M1 rifles about the ammo you use in them. The chamber pressure can be perfectly fine, but if the port pressure (pressure at the gas port in the barrel) is too high, you can damage the operating rod, and along with it, possibly the extractor and other parts. I had some Austrian .30-06 ammunition headstamped OJP that was not high in chamber pressure, but which, due to very high port pressure, caused such a violent return of the op rod and bolt that the extractor ripped right through the case rim, leaving the case in the chamber. The case would fall out of its own weight when the barrel was tipped up. I reserved that ammunition for use in one of my Springfield 03 variants. I have never used the Russian stuff, so can’t comment on it. I’m just expressing a caution. Some powders for reloading are not sutiable either. I can’t name them here, or the ones that are, though.


#5

I visited the IWA 2007 gun show in Nuernberg Germany and noted 30-06 cartridges with the groove. I asked Bernaul what the purpose of it was. Allthought most of the people present didn’t speak any german or english, the (very good looking) girl at their boot told me: Oh, we get that question all the time. It is made to strenghten the case. She then asked a stupid question to a cartridge collector: do you want some? So I have a few at home.


#6

Above cartridge is the 6,25x48,6 NIKONOV from Russia and the one below is the 30-06 from Bernaul

regards
gyrojet


#7

That 6.25 cartridge is a new one on me. Any more information about this caliber? I assume that the black tip color indicated “AP”.

AKMS


#8

I believe the groove is to prevent case head separation on the long cases such as 30-06. It works much like an expansion joint in a bridge and will give a little.


#9

This is exactly what the Russians are stating in one of their manuals for the development of small arms ammo.
They describe it as a system for calibers with high chamber pressure.

The russian 6mm experiments were made in the 1980s, were pretty extensive and included many different case types.


#10

This is exactly what the Russians are stating in one of their manuals for the development of small arms ammo.
They describe it as a system for calibers with high chamber pressure.

The russian 6mm experiments were made in the 1980s, were pretty extensive and included many different case types.[/quote]

I would be interested in a copy of that book, or details about it.


#11

“Design and Development of Small Arms and Ammunitin” by the Pensa Artillery Institue (V. M. Kirillov) from 1963 with 431 pages.
The e-version has a size of 350mb.