Big bullet


#1

Large lead bullet 1.015 in dia X 2.690 long. It has a copper gas check base and no markings. What might it be?
http://s564.photobucket.com/albums/ss89/majorbeau/?action=view&current=PICT0023.jpg


#2

1 inch aiming tube?


#3

Agree. British 1 inch Aiming Rifle, probably from a Cordite electric primed mark I or II or a Cordite percussion primed Mark I.

Regards
TonyE


#4

Are you interested in trading / selling this bullet?


#5

Could I have a few more details? Weapon,dates,country??


#6

This is a bullet from a British 1 inch Aiming Rifle. That is not a rifle in the traditional sense but a 1 inch calibre device that fits inside the breech and barrel of a large calibre gun (say a 6 inch gun) and allows gun crews to train in laying and firing the weapon at a fraction of the cost of the real thing. It also allows training to be carried out where range space is limited.

The first 1 inch aiming rifle was approved by the Ordnance Committee in 1893 and used the same case as the 1 inch Nordenfelt already in service with the Royal Navy. The early rounds were loaded with 400 grns of black powder and had hard lead bullets without a gas check. THe Mark V version had a paper patched bullet.

Electric primed versions were introduced for use in large calibre guns that were electrically initiated.

The first cordite loaded rounds were not introduce duntil 1913, and these used 160 grns of cordite to give an MV of 1080 fps at a distance of 240 feet. Cordite versions were also both percussion and electrically primed and all had a hard lead bullet with copper gas check.

Aiming rifles continued in service until at least WW2, mainly used by the Royal Navy, but the army also used them for some of their large guns, particularly coastal artillery.

There were also aiming rifles that used the .577/450 Martini round and of course the famous Morris tube for ordinary rifles used the .297/.250 cartridge.

Regards
TonyE