Big german ammo


#1

What is going on here ?


#2

Underground ammo storage, ammo is being moved on to the guns. Must be coast artillery.


#3

Naval coast artillery ?


#4

Yes, those guys are wearing Navy working clothes.

Hans


#5

Must be on land the way the projectiles are stacked


#6

Yes, in Germany the coast artillery was always navy business.


#7

#8

Yes, in Germany the coast artillery was always navy business.[/quote]

The Coastal Artillery reference which we sell has Luftwaffe , Heer and Kriegsmarine coast defense batteries. This is WW2 era. Did the mission change between wars ?


#9

I wonder if that changed in WWII only. All coastal batteries in Germany were navy to my knowledge.


#10

BTW … the railway guns in WW.1, too :-) Funny


#11

Any idea what the item marked with the X is ?


#12

The “Gun” shown is a Mortar, and the “X” is a pre-grooved driving band Mortar Bomb, with the propellant charge in the smaller diameter part. “Bomb” was Muzzle-loaded into Tube by engaging the driving band in the rifling, the Bomb itself then was lowered until the Prop.Charge contacted the Firing mechanism, and a Lanyard used to Discharge it ( from observations of a similar (Smaller) 7,58Cm Trench Mortar ( “MinenWerfer”)

This looks like the larger 20.3cm ( 203mm) MinenWerfer…also used for launching Gas shells. I think the “X” shell is either “Canister” or a Gas Shell. HE and Shrapnel shells have a typical “conical” shape.

The Mortar tube was supported by two “Recoil Absorbers” ( Hydraulic Piston tubes) and a Spring “Return to battery” recuperator.
The heavy base plate could be fitted with two Artillery-type wheels ( originally wood framed, later pressed steel) and the whole assembly man-handled into position by long bars and tow slings. The larger model was towed by Horses, whilst the smaller ( 7,58cm LMW) was either Horse-towed or Hand towed.
Those are proabaly the Limbers in the background.

Notice also the two versions of the M16 helmet ( foreground, two soldiers with “Wavy edge” over ears, whilst Gun-layer has the standard M16 which is commonly seen.

Any ID details of the photo? The Uniform variations would be of interest to people over on GB.

Regards,
Doc AV


#13

Thank you. I have never seen a cannister shell for this weapon. Seems odd for a high angle weapon.

The photo is a post card with no further ID.

What is GB ?


#14

The German rifled “Minenwerfer” in this caliber range were 170mm or 250mm.
The rifling of the 250mm had many more groves as the item in that image. The propelling charge for them was cup shaped and had a recess and the diameter was about identical to it’s heigth (170mm and 250mm).

There is no canister shell documented for the 170mm or 250mm by today.

The weapon here should be the 170mm.

What that “X” item is? I do not know.


#15

GB==Gunboards (www.gunboards.com): a Web-board dealing with Military and other guns (all types) with a distinct Historical and Uniform/Militaria section, populated by some very exceptional Collectors and Students of things military, from Helmets, Bayonets, Uniforms, Postcards, to Ships, Aircraft, vehicles, etc.
WW I section especially well endowed.

Doc AV


#16

And what does that mean?


#17

[quote=“DocAV”]GB==Gunboards (gunboards.com): a Web-board dealing with Military and other guns (all types) with a distinct Historical and Uniform/Militaria section, populated by some very exceptional Collectors and Students of things military, from Helmets, Bayonets, Uniforms, Postcards, to Ships, Aircraft, vehicles, etc.
WW I section especially well endowed.

Doc AV[/quote]

Thank you. I wish I had the time to follow all of these blogs.


#18

Further to my initial post in reply to the photo of the Minenwerfer, I have researched (Google & Wikipedia) and come up with the correct attribution…a 17cm ( 6,69 iches) Minenwerfer, made in over 2,000 examples for WW I by Rheinmetall.

Similar in concept to the 25cm( 10 inches) MW.

I confused the 20.3cm Haubitze Calibre ( a much Heavier Gun) etc with the MW.

Shells of both the 17cm and the 25cm were in two formats, the “Bullet shaped” type, and the Cylinder shape, both HE; The Fillings were Ammonium Nitrate-Carbon dust, a cheaper , but more sensitive filling than the Pre-War TNT.
Gun premature explosions were known and recorded during WW I with this more sensitive filling.

Examples of both sizes ( and the Light 6,58cm) exist around the world in leading Museums.

Regards,
Doc AV


#19

Thank you. What is the one in the photo ?


#20

Is there documentation on the supposedly cylindrical ones?
So far there is none amongst German documents and nothing in the hands of the leading German researchers.