Blank for Review

Hi to all,

Are these 2 blanks for British revolvers and if so for which ones? Measurements are as follows:

Top one
Overall: 37.88mm
Body: 12.90mm
Base: 13.35mm
Rim: 14.77mm

Bottom one
Overall: 38.62mm
Body: 10.63mm
Base: 14.40mm
Rim: 13.43mm

Thanking you all in advance and hoping to hear from some of you very soon.

Regards, juno44



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Anyone?

I am literally the last person to voice any opinion about these, but the primers look like shotgun shell ones to me, and I’ve never seen pistol ammo (besides 410) with such primers.
Also, as an advice, it is better to separate items into individual topics because people will be confused in their references without clear markings on these blanks (I assume nothing is written on them),

Juno44 - please check your measurements again. For example, on the “Bottom one” you show a base diameter of 14.40 mm. However, for the same cartridge you show a rim diameter of only 13.43 mm. However, in the picture, this cartridge clearly has a larger rim diameter than its base diameter. Something wrong here, and that could be one reason no one has made any real identification.

The cartridge with the 13.43 mm Rim diameter appears to me to be a Cartridge Small Arms Blank, .303 inch MARK l, to use a British designation. The case length of these rounds ran between 38 mm and 42 mm. Of course, with a blank, although suitable only for inserting directly into the rifle’s chamber, and NOT suitable for feeding from the weapon’s magazine. The Mark l blank was approved for Land and Naval service in February of 1890. In March of 1893 the designation was changed to “Cartridge SA Blank .303 inch Black powder without Bullet Mark l (rolled case).” At the same time it was also declared obsolete.

Reference: “.303 Inch,” Chapter 8, Page 166, by Peter Labbett and Freddy Mead.

These rounds were charged with 34 grains of black powder and had a felt over-powder wad inside the mouth of the cartridge.

The other blank is very close in size, but larger, and I can find no reference for it that matches. It is too small to be a .577/.450 Martini Rifle blank, it seems.

John Moss

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It would help is the cartridges were all in the same position in every photograph, rather than flipped right to left, and horizontal then vertical, easier to tell which one you make reference to.

Hi John,

Thank for getting back to me. Here are the measurement corrections which confirm that the bottom one is a Cartridge Small Arms Blank, .303 inch Mk l. As for the top one, do you think it is a British cartridge?

Top one
Overall: 37.88mm
Body: 12.50mm
Base: 13.37mm
Rim: 14.73mm

Bottom one
Overall: 38.62mm
Body: 10.63mm
Base: 11.40mm
Rim: 13.43mm

juno44 - I can’t really say if it is British or not. I don’t recall seeing any blanks of that type construction except coming from United Kingdom countries, bu I am not expert on these. I did collect .303 years ago, but sold that collection many years ago. I had some similar .303 blanks, as I recall, which is why I knew where to look to confirm the information I gave, but again, I am not qualified to make any overall assessments of rounds like these.

John Moss

Thank you John

One is clearly a .303 blank mark I and the other look like a cartridge who lost her bullet

the closest one, I can find for your unknown, is a .450 No 1 Rifle coiled, Eleys Boxer Patent (but yours is missing the bullet, as our french colleague already stated).

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Thank you to all of you