Bofors automatic cannon


#1

I’ve updated my web article on the Bofors 20-57mm automatic guns and ammunition, here: quarry.nildram.co.uk/Bofors.htm

The ammo family:


#2

The 20x145 and the 25x205 are the rarest of the Bofors shells in the USA. The Soviets used the 25 for years including WW2 and there were Yugoslav loads found by the case in the last unpleasantness there but few have made it to the USA yet.


#3

As described and illustrated at the end of my article, the Soviets changed the 25mm cartridge. Initial production used a rimmed 25x218R case (which is very rare) but in the 1950s they changed to a rimless 25x218 case which is now quite common in Europe.

The rarest one in Europe may be the 57x230R. I have only ever seen one case - which I bought. I had a replica projectile made from factory drawings.


#4

Interesting article but quite a leap to say that these are the same guns or versions of the same cartridges. They are the same caliber but neither the guns nor cartridges are 25mm Bofors . Quite a leap of artistic license. Don’t you have a fantasy thread elsewhere?

Here are some of my Chinese 25s. As you see they are BELT FED not CLIP FED as the Bofors guns were designed.


#5

Here is a brass one.


#6

I said no such thing. I said that the Russians “changed the 25mm cartridge” - which they obviously did. I didn’t say that the Russian ammunition or guns were “Bofors”, merely that the early ones were “based on the Bofors long-recoil designs”.

In fact, if you actually read my article as you claimed rather than inventing what I said, you will see that I stated that the first Russian 25mm “was not a copy of the Bofors 25mm m/32, differing in various aspects of the gun and ammunition design” and that the later 110-PM by Nudelman which used the rimless ammunition “departed from the Bofors-type long-recoil mechanism of the earlier guns in being a short-recoil design (basically a scaled-up version of the 23mm NS-23 aircraft gun)”.


#7

I read your posts not your articles. I prefer to look at the pictures. ReRead your post.

You are certainly correct that these are 25mms.

They used the same length catridge and reused the extant 25mm barrels in development none of which has anything to do with Bofors. Your post is about updating your BOFORS article.


#8

[quote=“DrSchmittCSAEOD”]I read your posts not your articles. I prefer to look at the pictures. ReRead your post.
[/quote]
You seem to be rather confused. First you say that “The 20x145 and the 25x205 are the rarest of the Bofors shells in the USA. The Soviets used the 25 for years including WW2” ; then you accuse me of saying that the Soviets used the Bofors 25, which I didn’t (either in my posts or my article). Then you say that I had written an “Interesting article” before saying “I read your posts not your articles”. It seems that you don’t really read either.


#9

Tony, thanks for the article. Here you have some 57 mm L/60 drawings from a Bofors catalog dated 1954-56. Projectile is HE-T (2,60/2,64 Kg; 920 m/s).


#10

Thanks Fede.


#11

I freaking love that 57 x 438R round! Very nice.

Jason


#12

[quote=“APFSDS”]I freaking love that 57 x 438R round! Very nice.

Jason[/quote]

You are going to be a general collector before its over. You will be spending turtle money on other shells.


#13

Haha! Maybe :-)