Bombs are ammunition


#1

What is this guy so happy about ?


#2

That his unit captured a US airfield?


#3

That the M103 series fuzes didn’t go off as designed?


#4

If I can read the beginning of the long column of script correctly, it says “Showa 17” which is 1942?..Thus the (US Made) Bombs (undamaged) are probably from Clarke Field in the PI. By 1943, The PI were solidly in Japanese hands, and these Bombs were probably being re-cycled to IJ Airforce use.

Interesting photo.

Maybe some one else can do a complete translation of the several columns of Kanji and Kana on the side of the photo.

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics.


#5

Yes, yes and yes. Very rare Japanese photo of captured US aircraft bombs.


#6

I have never seen a good photo of German troops with captured US or British bombs .


#7

As far my knowledge of history,

The Germans never invaded the US or England. How could they capture bombs?


#8

The RAF deployed a few light bomber squadrons to France in 1939, so I suppose they may have left a few bombs behind when they evacuated back to England in the face of the German invasion. But I think they were mostly single-engined Fairy Battles, which would have carried much smaller bombs than the ones in the photograph.

John E


#9

Actually the Battle light bomber was a product of the firm founded by Sir Richard Fairey and wasn’t the creation of the little folk. Jack


#10

There are images of non dropped British bombs in the German 1940 EOD manual L.Dv. 764.

Likely remnants of the British Expeditionary Force.


#11

As far my knowledge of history,

The Germans never invaded the US or England. How could they capture bombs?[/quote]

The tides of war ebb and flow. You can find photos of B17s and other allied craft captured by the Germans and all of these came from airfields which may have had bombs as well. The Japanese soldier in the photo did not obtain his glee from invading the US either.

You are wrong about the invasion of England. Germans occupied a variety of channel Islands which were and are England. If they had air bases I do not know. However , large ammo stocks were in place in many areas which were taken by the Germans.

There were British forces in France including air which were captured by Germans and remember DUNKIRK.

Germans had plenty of opportunities to capture allied air weapons and did.


#12

[quote=“EOD”]There are images of non dropped British bombs in the German 1940 EOD manual L.Dv. 764.

Likely remnants of the British Expeditionary Force.[/quote]

Can you post them ?


#13

[quote=“EOD”]There are images of non dropped British bombs in the German 1940 EOD manual L.Dv. 764.

Likely remnants of the British Expeditionary Force.[/quote]

Or taken on a British Airfield by a German “spy” of which there were many. Mostly Irish Nationalists.


#14

This is a quote from the US Intelligence bulletin Sept 43 .

" On the Western front, sightings of B-17’s apparently enemy operated, are increasing. Returning from one recent mission, the first wing of our heavy bombers was joined by one unidentified B-17 which accompanied the formation until near the German coast when it met some twin-engine enemy planes and turned back with them. While the purpose of this particular maneuver remains in doubt, the inherent dangers are obvious, although to date no attempts to imitate American markings have been observed. This is further illustrated by a recent report that on the return flight from an attack on a town in central Italy, one of a number of unescorted B-17’s was destroyed and three damaged by a P-38 marked with a swastika which made five determined attacks on the formation. The next day, during a return flight from northwest Sicily, a formation of light bombers was trailed by a tan-colored P-38 for forty miles before it turned back towards Italy. Photo reconnaissance has indicated the presence of one of these fighters on a nearby Italian airdrome. On another occasion over France, a P-47 was observed flying in company with an Me-109 and another enemy plane.

In addition, a Fortress has been photographed at a German Air Force experimental station and reports that the enemy has in his possession examples of other U.S. aircraft in good condition have been received from time to time ".

For further information see :

kg200.org/historyac1.html


#15

[quote=“DrSchmittCSAEOD”][quote=“EOD”]There are images of non dropped British bombs in the German 1940 EOD manual L.Dv. 764.

Likely remnants of the British Expeditionary Force.[/quote]

Can you post them ?[/quote]

It is just images take of the bombs, no German soldiers are posing. So if they were not contained in this manual they could have been taken anywhere.


#16

Back to the bombs, I did a little research and found that the fuzes weren’t M103 Series Mechanical Impact, but more closely resemble M105 Mechanical Impact, (page 467, OP 1664) , which begs the question, where are the arming cups with impellers, and where are the spacers that go in between the striker plate and the fuze body. The striker plate being flush to the fuze body leads me to believe that the bombs were armed, dropped and impacted and hence duds, which could induce the grin on the soldier.


#17

Bruce, then they would certainly have no fins and likely some impact marks on the paint job near the nose section no?


#18

EOD, Have dug for many a bomb in sand and dirt and found that it not only had the fins attached, it looked like it came from the factory. Also have seen them skip and have very little wear on the paint or fins. My point in this, though, is that the first two bombs have Mechanical Impact Fuzes (M105’s) that are in not only an armed state, but have been impacted, whether by dropping or by manual means, and have not been rendered safe.


#19

Seems we worked both in different geographic locations. Bombs with lots of paint on and even stunning good shape I have seen but those with fins on are really scarce over here in Germany (US and GB ones).


#20

From OP 1548 dated late 1945, this is what the M103A1 looks like. Didn’t see the M105 listed in that reference.

Dave