Booby traps


#1

ARE THESE BOOBY TRAPS, THE PIECES IN THE BOX NOT MARKED, ON THE BOX IS WRITTEN SV906 JDL 1951 AND ON THE OTHER SIDE IS 2O [PICTURE OF BROAD ARROW] H. SOME PARTS MISSING. [broad arrow on Australian military means property of.]
WHAT CALIBRE BLANK CARTRIDGE WOULD BE USED.


Second image [brass coloured] reminds me of Murray Mk 1 booby trap [303 type] with triggered pin and fuse accepting end, but have never seen this type before? can’t unscrew without damage to it but possibly a blank cartridge fits inside. The person I obtained these from said the person he got them from has a box full, all the same
Stamped into second image BB7 Mk 3 49

Any help appreciated. Terry.
SORRY ABOUT GLARY PHOTOES.


#2

Terry,

I know nothing about the stuff in the first image but the second item is probably a fuze igniter. The safety pin holds back a spring-loaded striker and the funnel shaped gadget at the other end has a standard .303" type cap chamber and live primer. The fuze would be inserted into the tube of the funnel and crimped in place with detonator pliers. Pulling the pin releases the striker, fires the cap, lights the fuze.

The two collars are screwed onto the body and should unscrew fairly easily.

gravelbelly


#3

Hi Terry,

The first item is a “Switch Aust. Combination Mark II” a boobytrap fuze functioning in pressure, pressure release and tripwire mode.
It used two types of detonator, one for charges and one for fuses, both obtained from an alteration of a 303 br. case.

The second item is a common “Percussion Igniter Mk. III” used for demolition works or, sometimes, in traps and landmines.

Regards
stecol


#4

Thank you gentelmen for the information, thought they were fuze ignighters but was not sure. Also thought there would be a powder monkey in our midst that could help. [powder monkey was an affectionate term used for explosive guys]
Terry,


#5

I think the term “Powder Monkey” is an old one, dating from the days of wooden naval sailing ships and iron men, in reference to the young boys who were used to transport powder from the ship’s magazine to the gunners during battle. Probably British Royal Navy in origin, but I imagine all nations having navies practiced the same thing at the time.


#6

Powder Monkey ?

I have been called in many manners in my life, in Rome there is the habit to give nicknames to people, but Powder Monkey never !
But considering the origins of the nickname, I like it ! :-) :-)

Ciao
Stefano