British hunting cartridges for the army


#1

Found these 2 rounds.

Kal. 16. Printed on the case


#2

These were used during WW2 to train aerial gunners for bombers to hit moving targets by having the trainee gunners fire at clay pigeons with shotguns from the back of a moving lorry. There is also an Eley “Rocket” tracer 12 Bore cartridge with the broad arrow printed on the side that was used for this purpose. The USA also made and used shotshells for this purpose. I’m sure someone else can go into more detail.


#3

Dutch

Falcon is correct. During WWII I had two older brothers who were in the USAAF and they got to do all of the shotgun shooting they wanted. They were both avid shooters before enlisting and they could hardly believe that Uncle Sam would pay them to shoot and provide both the shotguns and unlimited ammunition to boot.

I believe that the majority of shotgun shells were procured commercially but I don’t know if they were marked in any special way.

Ray


#4

The practice of using shotguns to train aerial gunners started in the RFC/RNAS in WWI. Commercial Kynoch ammunition with No.6 shot was normally used.

The 12b cartridge shown is a typical British military WW2 example for this purpose. The 16b with the “Special SG” load is unusual as these are normally found in 12b. They are not for training but are combat loads.

During the Malayan Emergency against Communist insurgents in the 1950s the British army conducted some operational research and found that the Browning auto shotgun loaded with SG was the most effective weapon for patrol work when compared with the rifles/Bren/Sten. The handiness of the shotgun and the very short combat ranges encountered in jungle fighting gave it a far higher kill ratio than the other weapons.

Also the Home Guard were issued with 12b spherical ball in the early days of WW2. These rounds also have the Broad Arrow printed on the side of the case and can be found with various coloured cases.

Regards
TonyE


#5

Falcon, Ray, TonyE,

Thank you for the explanations.

Think I found an interesting peace of British history.

Dutch


#6

[quote=“TonyE”]The practice of using shotguns to train aerial gunners started in the RFC/RNAS in WWI. Commercial Kynoch ammunition with No.6 shot was normally used.

The 12b cartridge shown is a typical British military WW2 example for this purpose. The 16b with the “Special SG” load is unusual as these are normally found in 12b. They are not for training but are combat loads.

During the Malayan Emergency against Communist insurgents in the 1950s the British army conducted some operational research and found that the Browning auto shotgun loaded with SG was the most effective weapon for patrol work when compared with the rifles/Bren/Sten. The handiness of the shotgun and the very short combat ranges encountered in jungle fighting gave it a far higher kill ratio than the other weapons.

Also the Home Guard were issued with 12b spherical ball in the early days of WW2. These rounds also have the Broad Arrow printed on the side of the case and can be found with various coloured cases.

Regards
TonyE[/quote]

Fleet Air Arm aircrew were still using shotguns and clay pigeons in 1966 for training/practice/fun. There were clay launchers mounted on the stern of aircraft carriers, below the flight deck round-down. The “guns” stood on the flight deck and shot at the clays we sent up. The cartridges were marked with a broad arrow.

gravelbelly