British ww2 navy ammo


#1

What is this fellow so happy about ?


#2

Dr.Schmitt,

Isn’t it obvious he is a collector of large ordnance?

Or, did he almost knock those doggies over and manage to grab them up before gravity got the best of the situation?

Either way, great photo…

Dave


#3

Here are a few more items along those lines. British Naval. From the Explosion museum near Portsmouth UK.

I had a similar smile on my face while taking the pictures.


#4

There were a great number of interesting pieces of ordnance and munitions at the EXPLOSION museum. My aspirations were to photograph them all, individually. HA! I did what I could in the time I spent there. It would take a number of trips to photograph and catalog the lot. If anyone is interested, I’ll post what I have here.
Here’s another taste.


#5

Yep, that’s a great little museum well worth a visit if you like large-calibre naval ordnance and ammo.

It’s worth pointing out to anyone thinking of visiting that it’s hard to find: it’s across the water from Portsmouth in Gosport, and has very limited opening hours (weekends only) from November to March. Their website: explosion.org.uk/

If you’re going there it’s also worth visiting the Fort Nelson museum (part of the Royal Armouries) just to the north of Portsmouth, which has a lot of large-calibre ordnance, particularly older stuff: royalarmouries.org/visit-us/fort-nelson

And of course the Royal Naval Museum in Portsmouth harbour: royalnavalmuseum.org/


#6

[quote=“SlickRick”]Here are a few more items along those lines. British Naval. From the Explosion museum near Portsmouth UK.

I had a similar smile on my face while taking the pictures.[/quote]

VERY FINE. THANKS. HOW ABOUT MORE PHOTOS ?


#7

[quote=“TonyWilliams”]Yep, that’s a great little museum well worth a visit if you like large-calibre naval ordnance and ammo.

It’s worth pointing out to anyone thinking of visiting that it’s hard to find: it’s across the water from Portsmouth in Gosport, and has very limited opening hours (weekends only) from November to March. Their website: explosion.org.uk/

If you’re going there it’s also worth visiting the Fort Nelson museum (part of the Royal Armouries) just to the north of Portsmouth, which has a lot of large-calibre ordnance, particularly older stuff: royalarmouries.org/visit-us/fort-nelson

And of course the Royal Naval Museum in Portsmouth harbour: royalnavalmuseum.org/[/quote]

Thanks Tony. I am too old to travel any more and am sure sorry to have missed that when I was there in 76. I spent our 200th anniversary in LONDON.
It was a HOT HOT HOT terrible HOT July 4th there.


#8

This gunner is smiling for a very good reason.


#9

Silly little observation but wearing his hat like that no way is it an official photo. Also judging by the length of his hair he has been a sea for some time.The beard is an indication of sea time as well. Things like that were allowed to slide at sea but on returning to port it was back to regulations.


#10

Edited to remove irrelevant trivia.

Now, the ammunition is 4 inch for the twin HA/LA mounting in the background. He is a Leading Seaman Gunlayer, perhaps he just won a crate of beer for a successful shoot! (RN ships were not “dry”).

This will be a tricky one to answer, no visible identification of which ship or what date. It may come down to a lucky guess on someones part.

gravelbelly


#11

Vince,

OK, so he is wearing his cap “flat-a’back”, not too big a crime. However I must disagree about the “beard”. In the Royal Navy you can grow a “set” which is a full beard and moustache, no beards or moustaches by themselves and no fancy Van Dyke trims. That is a fairly modest set by RN standards, there is no official limit to the length as long as it is neat. Beards which extend halfway down the chest were not unusual. You had to request to “discontinue shaving” before you grew, and request to shave off if necessary later. No shore leave was allowed until the set was well established.

Now, the ammunition is 4 inch for the twin HA/LA mounting in the background. He is a Leading Seaman Gunlayer, perhaps he just won a crate of beer for a successful shoot! (RN ships were not “dry”).

gravelbelly[/quote]

Yes, this is about ammunition; and ?


#12


#13

OH YES. THAT IS EXACTLY WHAT I LIKE TO SEE !


#14

Which gun is this ammo for ?


#15

[quote=“DrSchmittCSAEOD”]Which gun is this ammo for ?

[/quote]

It is for the 4.5 inch 8 Hundredweight (Cwt) gun. This single barreled mounting was about the size of a single Bofors 40/60 mounting. That looks like it in the first photo of SlickRicks’ post above yours. It is a much less powerful gun that any of the 4.5 inch guns that followed it.

gravelbelly


#16

To the best of my knowledge, it was only ever fitted to a handful of Motor Torpedo Boats and entered service just after WW2. I don’t have detailed case dimensions but according to Campbell the fixed ammo was 19 inches long and weighed 22 lb. A 14.7 lb shell was fired at 1,500 fps to a range of 3,300 yards at 10 degrees elevation (maximum mount elevation 12 degrees). Firing cycle was six seconds.

It has always seemed a totally bizarre choice to me; a low-velocity manually-loaded gun with a rainbow trajectory to add to the fun of trying to hit anything with a gun bolted to an MTB bouncing around all over the waves. IMHO the wartime autoloading 6 pdr Molins gun (57x441R ammo) was a much superior weapon for when more hitting power than the 40mm Bofors was required.


#17

[quote=“gravelbelly”][quote=“DrSchmittCSAEOD”]Which gun is this ammo for ?

[/quote]

It is for the 4.5 inch 8 Hundredweight (Cwt) gun. This single barreled mounting was about the size of a single Bofors 40/60 mounting. That looks like it in the first photo of SlickRicks’ post above yours. It is a much less powerful gun that any of the 4.5 inch guns that followed it.

gravelbelly[/quote]

Thank you. That is a new one to me.


#18

To the best of my knowledge, it was only ever fitted to a handful of Motor Torpedo Boats and entered service just after WW2. I don’t have detailed case dimensions but according to Campbell the fixed ammo was 19 inches long and weighed 22 lb. A 14.7 lb shell was fired at 1,500 fps to a range of 3,300 yards at 10 degrees elevation (maximum mount elevation 12 degrees). Firing cycle was six seconds.

It has always seemed a totally bizarre choice to me; a low-velocity manually-loaded gun with a rainbow trajectory to add to the fun of trying to hit anything with a gun bolted to an MTB bouncing around all over the waves. IMHO the wartime autoloading 6 pdr Molins gun (57x441R ammo) was a much superior weapon for when more hitting power than the 40mm Bofors was required.[/quote]

Yes, it certainly seems odd given what else was available. Thanks.


#19

Interesting history of the gun here;

navweaps.com/Weapons/WNBR_45-19_mk1.htm

Mounted on MTB and MGBs; Motor Torpedo Boats and Motor Gun Boats.
A few other comments.

This weapon system was designed for the Far East War where soft targets predominated and a large calibre low velocity gun could be fitted to Coastal Forces. A trial mounting was fitted to ML 570 before hostilities ended, but only limited production was undertaken post war, when the Mark II manual mounting was fitted to a few fast patrol boats.


#20

[quote=“DrSchmittCSAEOD”]What is this fellow so happy about ?

[/quote]

Back to the original question. What made British Navy AA gunners real happy about their ammo late in the war ?