Bullard cartridge: first "solid-head" rimless design?

I am researching Bullard cartriges and came across this claim:
“Bullard was the father of the modern solid - head cartridge as we know today. This cartridge, in .50 -115, was also semi - rimless (rimless), certainly a first in America and probably a first in the world.”
http://bullardrepeatingarms.homestead.com/historymrbullard.html
Is this true? and what does it mean?
Thanks,
Joel

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There is at least some validity to this claim, and the ‘as we know [it] today’ phrase provides for a lot of latitude. On the other hand solid head cartridges came a long way in the early 1870s and the 11 m/m Mauser cartridge in its 1875 version (to pick a good example) provided a rather hefty amount of brass around the primer pocket and lower walls of the case interior. Earlier solid head designs resulted in relatively poor support of the primer pocket and rim-to-body juncture. Jack

OK, so the head refers to the base of the cartridge that contains the primer and the rim? For some reason I thought they were referring to the neck/bullet.
Thanks,
Joel

Yes, the head is the base. It was particularly important for the big Bullard round to be strong in this area as the cut made for the extractor to grasp the case removed a lot of the material above the rim ordinarily present in a conventional rimmed cartridge. It seems to me Bullard dealt with the problems a [nearly] rimless design brought about in a powerful cartridge very well. Jack

Here is a link to the actual patent referenced if anyone wanted better pictures:
Link

Has anyone ever looked at Burton’s patent?
US136130.pdf (192.9 KB)

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