Bullet Board cleaning


#1

I got this Speer bullet board a while ago, a bargain at about £15/$25, however the background picture is dirty. Has anyone any idea on how to remove dirt/stains etc without messing up the Speer background. It looks like someone at some point has used a rubber* to try and remove the dirt.

  • We say Rubber, you (USA) say Eraser (I think.)


#2

What material is the background made of Simon? It looks like paper and, if it is, I think I’d scan or photograph it, clean it up with Photoshop, and then print it off. This would also allow you to re-do the text which has faded considerably. Some might consider this to be cheating but it’s the only way I can suggest to enhance it…and you might end up having to join a couple of sheets of A4 paper as well.


#3

You’re sort of in the realm of art restoration here. There are books on that topic that might be helpful, and I have seen one of them. Back in the days when paper wallpaper was used, there was a soft, doughy material (I think it was called EZ-Clean, or some such) that really worked. You just rubbed a ball of it over dirty wallpaper and it absorbed all the grime and stains. The stuff would change from a light blue to black in short order. Doing that job was one of my childhood chores, so I remember it well. It also had an unforgettable, but not unpleasant, aroma. It may still be available, might try the internet (Google on wallpaper cleaner) or a good paint and wallpaper store.

I just thought of something else - try Play-Doh. It was originally made as a wallpaper cleaner but was quickly adopted as a toy. Also, try a wad of soft white bread.


#4

Dennis K

You must be a really old guy. I have fond memories of using that pink stuff for cleaning wallpaper during WW II. Back then, many homes were heated with coal furnaces and kerosine lamps were still used to save electricity. The dirt that built up on the walls and ceilings was more soot that anything else and the pink stuff took it right off. The kids, of course, always wanted a ball of nice clean stuff, more to play with than cleaning walls, so my mother had to guard the supply like it was gold. I don’t recall what we did with the black balls. Probably tossed it in the city dump where it lies buried even today. I don’t think there was anything that could destroy it, not even Mother Nature.

Simon

I have cleaned a lot of cartridge cartons using solvents like Acetone or Laquer Thinner but I’d hate to recommend them on something with so much color and printing. Are there any hidden places where you can test different cleaners? Maybe start with an artist’s eraser, what we call art-gum here. I’ve also used one of the modern erasers, made of some sort of synthetic material, usually white and very soft. It works well to remove some dirt and most pencil marks without harming the base colors.

Good Luck

Ray


#5

Well, I’m old but not yet senile. My wallpaper cleaning was mainly in the 1950s, but you are right - we, like most others, had a coal fired furnace in the basement (remember basements?) that was pretty dirty. My father changed to fuel oil heating when I went off to college and he had no one else to keep the fire burning and carry out the ashes. I often wondered about how many tons of coal and ashes I shoveled during that time. I seem to remember the cleaning stuff was blue-colored, but maybe it was pink, or maybe it could have been in both colors.


#6

I think it’s paper on cardboard and the bullets are glued onto the paper/board, so I can’t copy it, which is a bit of a bummer.

I’ll have a go at the other methods if there is an area out of sight on the board.

Thanks for the help.


#7

Simon

On the off chance that there’s a museum in Scunthorpe you could ask the Curator how he/she would clean something like that. (You’ll probably have to drive to Norfolk to find such a fancy facility, however.)

I certainly wouldn’t take the board with me. They would probably confiscate it on the spot.

Continued good luck.

Ray


#8

[quote=“RayMeketa”]Simon

On the off chance that there’s a museum in Scunthorpe you could ask the Curator how he/she would clean something like that. (You’ll probably have to drive to Norfolk to find such a fancy facility, however.)

I certainly wouldn’t take the board with me. They would probably confiscate it on the spot.

Continued good luck.

Ray[/quote]

My bold.

Good idea.

Don’t think Norfolk will have a fancy facility, Norfolk is only just coming to terms with Horseless Carriages.


#9

My advice which may seem a bit negative is not to try. For what you paid for it accept it as a good board for the price. Which it was.


#10

My first reaction was the same as Vince’s. Don’t do anything. But, I can see by looking closely at the photograph that there are places that are obviously cleaner than others and I’m sure that if I saw it in person I’d be inclined to fix it somehow.

Another idea occured to me. Something that I’ve done on occasion, on small projects. Have you thought about restoring the clean areas back to their dirty condition? I’ve done that by using pastel colored chalk, in powder form, very lightly dusting it on and then blending it in with a cotton swab. You should be able to match the different colors almost exactly. Unless you are color-challenged, in which case that would be a bad idea.

Ray


#11

Vince, Ray, thanks for the answers the cleaning back to dirty is wacky enough to work.


#12

[quote=“RayMeketa”]Simon

On the off chance that there’s a museum in Scunthorpe you could ask the Curator how he/she would clean something like that. (You’ll probably have to drive to Norfolk to find such a fancy facility, however.)

I certainly wouldn’t take the board with me. They would probably confiscate it on the spot.Continued good luck.

Ray[/quote]

Ray
now that the serious discussion on this thread is over I would just like to add a footnote to this thread which grieves me.

Under British law, an ordinary person (ie not a licenced cartridge collector) could not own that board and could risk a mandatory jail sentence if caught with it. I don’t know of anyone who ever has mind you. Expanding ammunition, even unloaded projectiles on a board are on the banned list and the penalties severe.

So some totally innocent person who bought a board like that twenty years ago, perfectly legally and hung it on their wall could now be an arch criminal without even having the slightest reason to know it. The trouble with mandatory sentencing is it allows the judge no leeway for mitigation. Ridiculous.


#13

Vince, as it stands at the moment:

From 2002 Guidance - Chapter 2 pp. 7

Unless there has been a court ruling ( I’ve not heard of one) then, this is the current state of play.

v) Display Boards and decorative purposes

In the absence of a Court ruling, inert
cartridges and ammunition mounted on
display boards are not regarded as being
subject to the Acts. Similarly, inert bullets
mounted on key rings or cuff links are
assumed to be exempt.

So the HP & SP bullets on a Bullet board are legal to have but if even one bullet fell off you would be committing an offence.

I’ve recently had to remove the HP & SP bullets from 300- 400 inert rds of Wildcat ammo (Once I had realised that I needed a permit, they were collected from me by a person with the required Permit).

Anyone got spare fmj bullets of calibres between .19 & .50 and not forgetting any of the Metric calibres please contact me.


#14

Could that text be interpreted with “inert cartridges” and “ammunition mounted on display boards” as separate entities. I mean referring to both the loose inert rounds and these rounds when mounted on a board. I see that keychains and cufflinks are also exempt.

It seems like if you have inert HP rounds and you simply mounted them into a cheap wooden frame with wires you would then be alright.


#15

Falcon
We have had this discussion before off forum. These are grey areas that its best to stay out of. Until some unfortunate collector gets hauled into court and there is a ruling we just don’t know. Until then stay well away from grey areas. We don’t want you to be that collector. Stay safe.


#16

I am not old but I used that kind of rubber during my schooldays. It is still available and easy to find. We call it “gomma pane” ( bread rubber"

It’s nice to see that this thing has been used mainly as a toy than a rubber almost everywhere for decades